Adventurous Jenni Fox wears leopard print hair.

BEAUTIFUL YOU: Anything goes in hair style trends

Social media has definitely changed the way people look at fashion and style

  • Jan. 22, 2015 9:00 a.m.

When it comes to hair style trends, Fish Hair Salon stylist Yasmin Morris says, “anything goes.”

Morris, who has been working as a stylist for more than 16 years, says more and more, people know what they want and what they want is individual style.

“There’s no Jennifer Aniston (must-have style) anymore. People sit in my chair and they’ve seen a statement or want to create a style that suites them and their lifestyle. It makes for everyone looking extremely different,” she says.

Social media has definitely changed the way people look at fashion and style, says Morris. “There’s Pinterest now and Instagram. People used to look at hair magazines and celebrities for ideas, now they’re influenced by selfies of people using Pinterest or Instagram.”

People are trying new looks with colour these days, although pastel colour is not a strong look. “I do maybe one pastel hair colour a month. The stronger trend is root shading. … It’s different from ombre, it’s a more melting of tones. It doesn’t look as dipped with high contrast, now it’s softer, more sun-kissed,” she says.

One thing that hasn’t hit Victoria yet is baby lights. “They’re teeny, tiny foil highlights. I think within a year or two it will be a very big thing,” says Morris. “They’re very soft, diffused highlights.”

Every client is different, says Morris, but most know they need to communicate with their stylist to get the look that suits them best. “You have to work with people’s natural hair texture – not try to straighten the heck out of natural waves,” she says. “I would say people are more hair-savvy, or hair-intelligent, it makes us stay on our game. Sometimes clients come in and they know abut a product before we do.”

Fish provides a variety of hair care products for their clients.

“People are more interested in the science for sure. They like to know how the colouring products work. I think they’re more interested in how they work, than what’s in them.”

More and more men are into styling their hair – and colouring as well. “Fish has a large male clientele. I think men are paying more attention to how they look now,” she says.

“We  often do colour for men to camouflage grey. It’s really fast only takes five to 10 minutes and you don’t get that distinct line when it grows out.”

If you’re looking for a new stylist, Morris says find someone you can talk to. “Find someone who really listens to you. Someone you can sit down with and have a conversation. And find someone who’s excited about what they do.”

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