Smart Meters are faulty

BC Hydro is denying it, our provincial government is avoiding it...

BC Hydro is denying it, our provincial government is avoiding it, and the ombudsman appears to be wrapped so tightly in muffling red tape that we’re going to have to call on a superhero with scissors to come to the rescue. Despite BC Hydro’s (or should that be Hydra?) head-in-the-sand efforts to blame the failure of so-called Smart Meters to take accurate energy readings on the public, the evidence is becoming increasingly clear that there is a crucial flaw to these devices.

In short, they don’t work.

The top energy bosses can pop their braces and cough ‘bullshit’ into their cupped hands as loud as they please, but the proof is in the energy bills. Before the installation of a Smart Meter on my own home, my monthly electricity bill sat consistently around $150/month in the winter. The month directly following the installation of the Smart Meter, that bill jumped to $300. Nothing had changed inside the house: no new electronics, we still wear slippers and cuddle under blankets on the couch instead of turning up the heat, and we didn’t start growing medical marijuana in the basement.

So why the $150 jump? Well, according to Hydra, it’s not the meter’s fault, and we have to take their word for it because they refuse to check it. The bosses have said the meters work, so the underlings have to spout the same company rhetoric even though I’m sure they’ve noticed nasty jumps in their own personal energy bills.

In the same month, my neighbour’s hydro bill tripled — on just one-half of the duplex he owns. The other half it appears has remained mostly unchanged. After being given the runaround by Hydra, who told him that it would cost an unrefundable $90 to have someone come out, he flipped all the breakers off on the energy-sucking half of his duplex and went to see how much money he was saving by not using any electricity at all. The newly-installed Smart Meter was still spinning faster on the side with all the breakers off than on the other half that was drawing power.

Hydra still refuses to send someone to look at the meter, insisting that they all work perfectly.

So now it’s my turn to call ‘bullshit’ — only I’m not coughing it into my hand. This is a fiasco that is going to blow up in not only BC Hydro’s face, but also in the weeping maw of the already-weakened Liberals who are refusing to stand up for the hard-working families of this province who cannot afford for their utility bills to suddenly and unfairly spike.

Once these Smart Meters begin ripping off corporate clients to the same level that they are stealing from the general public, a class-action suit won’t be far behind — and the rebate bill will be enormous. But most of us can’t wait that long; it’s time for the province to investigate and halt this blunder now. M

Just Posted

Royal BC Museum set to launch its latest exhibition coup

Victoria institution’s new show on the Maya makes its North American debut May 17

VOS transforms the McPherson into a swamp for Shrek The Musical

Victoria Operatic Society’s musical theatre production appeals to all ages

UnoFest: Pushing boundaries and challenging audiences for 22 years

Annual solo theatre festival kicks off 11 days of inspiring artistry on May 1

Elegant waterfront gala to launch new Ballet Victoria season

Tickets still available for Spring Soiree on April 26: meet the dancers, bid on great auction items

Just looking, or buying? You can find that perfect art piece at Sidney show

Saanich Peninsula Arts and Crafts Society holding Spring Show April 27-28 at Mary Winspear Centre

Peninsula grandmothers salute Roaring ’20s fashion

May 3 event in Sidney benefits Grandmothers Helping African Grandmothers

Belmont secondary’s student-run bistro experiences opening-day rush

Culinary students serving up affordable lunches to fellow classmates

Sooke Community Choir offers up #modernlove

Sooke concerts run from May 3 to 5

Celebration of Light fireworks to feature two new countries

India and Croatia will compete for the first time, alongside Canada

Stephen Fearing brings unique style to concert series

Fearing will play Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Sooke on April 27

Sidney Classical Orchestra hosts former dean of Victoria Conservatory

Canadian pianist Jamie Syer to play pieces by Beethoven, Haydn at Saturday concert in Sidney

REVIEW: Symphony, Jeans ‘n Classic perform jolly good Queen show

Strengthened by UVic Vocal Jazz Ensemble, the group performs tonight and Sunday at the Royal

Most Read