Letter: Radiation fears grow

On the radio I heard our BC government has ordered pharmacies not to sell nor to stockpile iodine tablets — because they don’t want to “alarm” the population.

On the radio I heard our BC government has ordered pharmacies not to sell nor to stockpile iodine tablets — because they don’t want to “alarm” the population. The consensus among the powers that be is that there is little chance of wind-borne radioactive iodine from Japan. Should things change, the government will let us know when and if we might need to fend off radiation. At that time, I expect to see long line-ups of panic-stricken folks and shortages of medication, very  similar to the shortage of H1N1 flu vaccine a year ago. Government will not accept any blame because they believed (or told us they did) that the radiation problem was not likely to occur — because they didn’t want to alarm us, ya see? Hmmm. By that logic, perhaps they might  forbid us to buy home fire extinguishers or fire insurance — because it is not likely that our houses will burn down. It makes perfect sense, except in the unlikely event that your house is on fire. As I sort through the alarmingly  contradictory reports from governments, nuclear industry friends and foes, media pundits, and PR flacks, I still prefer to decide for myself whether or not to be alarmed,  and whether or not to keep medication handy, just in case.  If I don’t need it this time, well, there’s always next time.

Marty Hykin, Victoria

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