Ban on all motor vehicles is inevitable

Most weeks, my job is to sift through headlines and press releases in order to snatch a grain of truth

Ban on all motor vehicles is inevitable

Most weeks, my job is to sift through headlines and press releases in order to snatch a grain of truth from the heaps of pointless information flowing through media and political circles here in the City of Gardens. This week, it looks like the pols responsible for dressing up the facts have decided to make my job a little easier.

Presumably trying to defend The Capital’s No Fun City title against long-time rival Vancouver, the VicPD recently issued a press release declaring “downtown sidewalks no place for skateboards, bikes,” and announcing a crackdown on anyone foolish enough to use alternative transport in the city’s core. The release goes on to explain that “the enforcement campaign comes in response to an elderly tourist couple being injured by a skateboarder on the sidewalk in early July,” proving once again that the tourist is king in our sleepy little town.

This announcement surely heralds another which will be of greater concern to the broader public. Victoria Police responded to 715 motor vehicle collisions in 2007, 368 of which resulted in injury. If a single collision between a skateboarder and a tourist is enough to outlaw human-powered transport entirely, residents should expect VicPD to issue a ban on motor vehicles any day now.

Continuing the trend toward radical honesty, the CRD has announced that its controversial compliance with provincial and federal sewage treatment requirements will forge ahead with the creation of a seven-member expert steering committee. In keeping with governments’ general distaste for public involvement in the business of governance, the committee will not include any elected representatives from the capital region.

Residents worried about handing over one of the largest infrastructure projects the CRD has ever seen to an unelected body can rest easy though. According to a recent statement by CRD member Denise Blackwell, the bylaw which will give birth to the expert panel will also include “explicit language to ensure financial accountability.” Not to worry, government bodies always follow their own rules.

Normally, I would decry the tendency of the political class to dress their otherwise obvious bias and callousness up as somehow serving the best interest of the public. While neither of these events is surprising, we have to wonder if the powers that be in The Capital aren’t getting a bit too comfortable out in the open. M

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The COVID-19 pandemic had an effect on film production on central and north Vancouver Island, says Vancouver Island North Film Commission. Pictured here, production of TV series Resident Alien in Ladysmith earlier this year. (Black Press file)
Film commissioner says COVID-19 cost central Island $6 million in economic activity

Jurassic World: Dominion, Chesapeake Shores among productions halted due to pandemic, says INFilm

Chelsey Moore’s character Chloe in the upcoming virtual reality game Altdeus: Beyond Chronos. Screengrab
Vancouver Island actress finds success in a virtual world

Black Creek’s Chelsey Moore lends her voice to a new video game set for release in December

Ceramic artist Darrel Hancock working on a clay jug in his home studio in Qualicum Beach. (Submitted photo)
Qualicum Beach potter Darrel Hancock celebrates 40 years in business

‘It’s wonderful to do what you love and make a living at it’

Artist Daniel Cline discusses his sculpture, Harmony Humpbacks, during the June 20 walking tour of Oak Bay’s 2019 ArtsAlive sculptures. Harmony Humpbacks was purchased by Oak Bay as the 2019 people’s choice winner and is permanently installed at the Beach Drive entrance to Willows Park. (Kevin Murdoch Photo)
Influx of donated art a ‘fantastic problem to have,’ says Oak Bay mayor

Oak Bay goes from zero to 10 permanent art pieces since 2015

Next month Nanaimo musician Spencer Hiemstra releases his solo debut album, ‘Wildlife.’ (Photo submitted)
Nanaimo musician Spencer Hiemstra releases solo debut album

New record ‘Wildlife’ about taking chances and going through changes

Dover Bay Secondary School student Victoria Hathfield’s poem <em>Dear Santa</em> appears in<em> Chicken Soup for the Soul: Christmas is in the Air</em>. (Photo courtesy Darren Lee)
Nanaimo high schooler has first poem published in ‘Chicken Soup for the Soul’

Victoria Hathfield’s ‘Dear Santa’ appears in new Christmas-themed edition of anthology series

Nanaimo graphic designer Amy Pye has written and illustrated her first children’s book, <em>G is for Grizzly Bear: A Canadian Alphabet</em>. (Photo courtesy Amy Pye)
Nanaimo graphic designer releases first children’s book

Amy Pye teaches the Canadian alphabet in ‘G is for Grizzly Bear’

The Vancouver Island Symphony’s Back Row Brass Quintet – including trumpeter Mark D’Angelo, tuba player Nick Atkinson and French horn player Karen Hough (from left) – were scheduled to tour the Nanaimo area with Christmas Under the Big Tent, but the concert series has now been cancelled. (Photo courtesy HA Photography)
Symphony brass quintet’s Christmas concert series cancelled

Performances were to happen at venues in Parksville and Lantzville next month

The Sheringham Point Lighthouse, near Shirley. (Contributed - Lee-Ann Ruttan)
New book shines a light on Sheringham Point Lighthouse

Publication examines history, lightkeepers, and volunteer society

Victoria-based guitarist Eric Harper performs at the Port Theatre on Nov. 27. (Photo credit Tatum Duryba)
Classical guitarist to play at the Port Theatre

Eric Harper to play new songs composed during the pandemic

A sample of some of Lou-ann Neel’s jewelry.
Lou-ann Neel wins the Fulmer Award in First Nations Art

Originally from Alert Bay, Neel’s family is steeped in renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artists

Most Read