Fourth year Visual Arts UVic student Brandon Poole's show The Principle of Original Horizontality runs until Nov. 6 at the fifty fifty collective off Douglas Street.

Fourth year Visual Arts UVic student Brandon Poole's show The Principle of Original Horizontality runs until Nov. 6 at the fifty fifty collective off Douglas Street.

Piecing it all together

UVic Visual Arts student Brandon Poole talks about his show The Principle of Original Horizontality

As the ground violently shook beneath the feet of terrified bystanders on June 23rd 1946… it set events into motion that would take a young, inexperienced sailor on a path of transformation into one of Victoria’s emerging artists.

But, it’s been a long time coming for Brandon Poole.

With a few detours through journalism, photography, sailing, philosophy and carpentry –– Poole finally feels at peace with his craft.

The naturally shy, soft-spoken, fourth year Visual Arts student at the University of Victoria, can seem uncomfortable with the spotlight at times, but the walls start to break down when he talks about his latest work, currently being showcased by the not-for-profit, volunteer-run, fifty fifty arts collective.

His show – The Principle of Original Horizontality – runs until Nov. 6.

“It’s kind of a mad science project,” he said.

It’s similar, but a bit more sophisticated.

The project centres around a streamlined modern house built in 1946, the same year the largest earthquake to ever hit Vancouver Island occurred with an epicentre bullseyed on Campbell River. The exhibit features a flat-screen TV mounted to the wall in a semi-enclosed area at the back of the white-walled gallery.

The TV plays three video clips on a constant loop.

The first clip shows a house on Denison Road in Victoria’s south.

As Poole’s research progressed, the links between the house and Francis Denison — Victoria’s first seismologist — takes an eerie turn.

“It seemed everywhere I turned, something would pop up. Like for instance … this house was being renovated when I encountered it and it was being seismically upgraded,” he said.

“A hundred and fifty metres from this house is the Gonzales Hall Observatory that was Denison designed and built, and where Victoria’s seismograph equipment was housed. Francis Denison also died a day after the 1946 earthquake. So there’s this odd sort of oscillation of events. … all this weird stuff that just kind of kept falling on to each other.”

The second clip is simply just a black screen, with a red laser level running across the middle of it.

Until the floor rumbles.

And then that precise red line jumps, like a heart beat on a monitor.

“The laser level line that is projecting into the space on top of the projection screen is playing out the earthquake that I got the seismogram information from the Geological Survey of Canada,” he explained.

There’s a contact microphone picking the vibrations in an eccentric rotating motor that’s attached to a subwhoofer, causing the space to shake.

The third clip is of a military green steel production machine, feeding and prepping blood red crepe paper through production. The vibrancy of the paper is carried through on to a large wooden frame, where it’s hung to create a laternesque look.

The exhibit showcases Poole’s creativity, intellect and philosophical sides, and challenges viewers to piece the puzzle together on their own.

“This is the first work I’ve done that I’ve made use of skills that I studied,” he said. “When I went to journalism school I was too shy to be a good journalist. I didn’t have the confidence to really get into other peoples stories, and I felt that this work is the first time I’ve chased leads. But that is the great thing about art; it doesn’t have to add up in any sort of coherent way. You can just gesture towards coincidences rather than have to state them out right. That being said, I have a lot of people come in and they want to know how it all connects, so I do end up talking about the connections.”

Poole’s vision caught the attention of judges who short-listed him for the Presentation’s House Gallery’s Lind Prize — a $5,000 award that supports emerging artists working with video, photography and film.

As this exhibit winds down, Poole looks to new inspirations for his next piece and merges more into the cinematic world of video.

“I’m interested in the relationship between images and objects … that really fine line that makes the jump from a photograph to a video. So many early work was just all set up the camera on the tripod and film and then let things happen in the space in the composition and so that work there that you saw of the Christmas cracker machine, is the most cinematic work I’ve done so far,” he said.

Poole will be part of panel discussion Nov. 5 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Open Space for a panel discussion with Victoria artists Trudi Lynn Smith, Cedric Bomford, Brandon Poole as well as artists from the current exhibition The Absence Of The Origin Of Its Likeness, Arnold Koroshegyi, and Laura Dutton. Each artist will introduce his/her own practice and will then engage in a discussion around contemporary photography. Lynda Gammon will moderate the panel and audience participation will be encouraged.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Everett Bumstead (centre) and his crew share a picture from a tree planting location in Sayward on Vancouver Island from when they were filming for ‘One Million Trees’ last year. Photo courtesy Everett Bumstead.
The tree planting life on Vancouver Island features in new documentary

Everett Bumstead brings forth the technicalities, psychology and politics of the tree planting industry in his movie

Scaredy Cats television series has turned Empress Avenue in Fernwood into a Halloween themed neighbourhood. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)
PHOTOS: Trick or treat! Halloween comes to Fernwood in January

New television series Scaredy Cats filming in Victoria

Cindy Foggit plays the lead role of Eliza in Passion and Performance’s film production Eliza: An Adaption of a Christmas Carol. (Courtesy of Rachel Paish)
Victoria adult dance studio releases modern adaption of A Christmas Carol

Instead of usual stage performance, dance studio turns to film

There are many options for enjoying a meal out locally during Dine Around and Stay in Town, on now through Feb. 7. (10 Acres Commons)
Dine Around Stay in Town Victoria carries added importance during pandemic

Special menu items for eat in or takeout/delivery, staycation deals available through Feb. 7

Peter Crema and Harmony Gray (from left), past participants of the Nanaimo Art Gallery’s Code Switching teen art group, at work in ArtLab in 2019. The NAG will be expanding the space thanks to a $75,000 arts infrastructure program grant. (Bulletin file photo)
Nanaimo Art Gallery, Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre receive new arts infrastructure funding

Province announces recipients of funding through B.C. Arts Council program

Ty Wesley, Nicole Darlington and Cameron Macaulay (from left) performed in the Beholder Entertainment production <em>Gender Sucks!</em> in the 2020 Nanaimo Fringe Festival. (Video still courtesy Sam Wharram)
Nanaimo Fringe Festival artist lottery open to local and B.C. playwrights

Organizers hope to stage plays in-person at indoor and outdoor venues this summer

Canadian singer-songwriter-actor Joëlle Rabu will join her son, Nico Rhoades, for a livestream performance courtesy the Tidemark Theatre Jan. 29. Photo submitted
Mother/son powerhouses Joelle Rabu and Nico Rhodes join forces for Island livestream

Campbell River’s Tidemark Theatre hosts online music revue

Dr. John Hooper is the new conductor of Island Voices. Photo supplied
Island Voices welcomes new conductor

Dr. John Hooper to lead mid-Island based choir

Jorie Benjamin does a modern dance performance to ‘La Vie en rose’ by Édith Piaf, Louis Gugliemi and Marguerite Monnot, choreographed by Elise Sampson during the Cowichan Music Festival’s Highlights Concert at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre on March 1, 2020. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
Cowichan Music Festival cancelled for 2021

The festival had already been limited to solo performances only for 2021

<em>Chinook Salmon: Breaking Through</em> by B.C.’s Mark Hobson was selected among 13 entries as the winner of the Pacific Salmon Foundation’s Salmon Stamp Competition.
Stained-glass lighting casts a win to B.C. salmon artist

Painting of chinook is Mark Hobson’s third win in annual contest

Apollonian means “serene, calm, or well-balanced; poised & disciplined”. The natural photo art for the album includes Vancouver Island mountains, rivers and beaches. Scenes from the Cowichan River, Witchcraft Lake, Pipers Lagoon, Wall Beach and other popular Island recreation destinations accentuate the album. (RICHIErichieRichie Music Publishing photo)
Serenity Now! Richie Valley debuts third LP dubbed Apollonian

Apollonian means “serene, calm, or well-balanced; poised & disciplined”

Most Read