Urbanite, set for Sept. 28 at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, explores how photographic technologies have mediated and shaped our relationship to forests and forest ecology. This image shows UVic visual arts professor Kelly Richardson’s exhibit at the gallery. Photo contributed

Urbanite: A hip and fun immersion in art

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria brings cool to the forefront Sept. 28

The Art Gallery of Greater Victoria has built upon past exhibitions in the planning of its upcoming event, designed to animate the themes of those exhibitions in fun and dynamic ways.

The evening was largely inspired by Supernatural Art: Art Technology and the Forest, an event that features contemporary photo and video-based work by artists working in British Columbia who are using technology to consider the idea of the forest as a social and cultural artifact.

The exhibition explores how photographic technologies have mediated and shaped our relationship to forests and forest ecology; and how computer generated imaging and 3D technologies are suggesting the need for a new approach to our relationship with the trees.

Urbanite, scheduled for Sept. 28, builds on the Supernatural exhibition to offer what the Gallery has described as the hippest, happening night of art and mingling in the city.

Art lovers will experience the themes of previous exhibitions through custom cocktails, exhibition interventions, live music and hands-on activities.

See Monsters (Dean Hunt and Bracken Hanuse Corlett) will be spinning the tunes and visuals for the event. They’re an audio-visual duo who have been performing together across Turtle Island since 2011 to the delight of audiences at every performance.

Dean has been DJing and producing music for 15+ years and practices full-time as a contemporary artist working within the Heiltsuk traditions of painting and carving. Bracken hails from the Wuikinuxv and Klahoose Nations and also works in a variety of media including digital design, painting and sculpture.

Artist Trudi Lynn Smith will be activating her ‘breath camera’ at the event. It’s a multi-part project that involves still images and performances in which the performances expand on the practice of noticing while immersed in a camera-form.

The Breath Camera mixes the fleshy with the fleeting. It is a wearable form made to expand on capacities for noticing while immersed in/as camera. Users shroud themselves in a long one-by-four-metre dark cloth and supports the camera in their hands. Controlling the flexible bellows, air circulates through the camera, and images slip in and out of focus.

Urbanite comes to the Art Gallery on Sept. 28.

Tickets are available at aggv.ca/urbanite.

– Monday Magazine staff

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

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