Preview: Eco Warriors

Documentary explores why active resistance draws attention

Activist Tre Arrow stands on a nine-inch ledge outside the U.S. Forest Service building in Oregon. Arrow is one of many regional activists featured in the new documentary Eco Warriors, screening Thursday Oct. 11 at UVic.

A new documentary screening Thursday at UVic asks the question “When did activism become terrorism?”

The film, Eco Warriors, by Pickford Productions and the Red Octopus Collective features moving interviews with notable environmental activists from the Pacific Northwest, including former FBI most-wanted poster boy Tre Arrow (pictured left on the U.S. Forest Service Building), “Raging Granny”  Ruth Masters, Clayoquot Sound protest camp organizer Tzeporah Berman, scientific researcher Alexandra Morton (of the Raincoast Research Society) and a list of other effective activists, authors and free thinkers from the region.

Although the documentary brings to light how these environmental activists are increasingly being treated like the eco-terrorists the media and government often make them out to be, there is still a resilient hopefulness apparent in each of these activists’ stories of resistance, leaving a sense of possibility in place of despair.

Go get inspired to effectively make a difference in these tumultuous times.

Thurs., Oct. 11 at 7pm in UVic’s David Lam Auditorium. The evening also features a talk-back with producer Jennifer Pickford and activist Zoe Blunt of the Forest Action Network. Admission by donation ($10 suggested).

 

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