Jerry Seinfeld proves he’s master of his domain

NBC star brings a night of laughs and truth to Victoria's "Hockey Arena Theatre"

Jerry Seinfeld dissected some of life's most trivial moments Sat., May 4 at Save-on-Foods Memorial Centre

Jerry Seinfeld dissected some of life's most trivial moments Sat., May 4 at Save-on-Foods Memorial Centre

As with any career and its required skills, some comedians do things better than others.

For Jerry Seinfeld, his specialty – as evidenced in his TV show – is dissecting some of the most trivial, mundane moments in life and finding the humour of the situation.

He’s not edgy, and he’s not crude; that’s never been his territory. On stage he’s a married father of three who finds laughs in the little things in life.

Performing Saturday night to a sold-out show at Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre, or our “hockey arena theatre” as he called it, Jerry Seinfeld, the 59-year-old comedian, was the very same same-named character we watched for nearly a decade on NBC.

Many of his jokes – especially his newer stuff, where he riffs on cellphones and those window stickers families put on their minivan – could easily be used as fodder for great conversational scenes involving Kramer, George and Elaine, if the show was still around.

Those high-pitched inflections in his voice when he gets exasperated, and the facial expressions he makes to sell the authenticity of every joke that little bit more gives off the impression that the Seinfeld character he played on TV is the same guy who’s performing live in Victoria.

Despite his wealth and fame, he doesn’t come off as being any different than you or I. As a father and a husband, the animated comedian is your everyman who encounters the same type of people and gets himself in the same situations we do – he’s just talented enough to make a living out of commenting on it.

That was reaffirmed by the woman sitting behind me, who would exclaim, “That’s so true!,” through fits of laughter after every joke.

While irritating, she couldn’t have been more correct.

His source material is the world we all know, and he has a natural ability to pick apart the little moments in life we all experience and find those silver linings.

But the world is changing fast, and Seinfeld’s slowly beginning to lag behind.

Outdated bits about *69 and caffeine addictions would’ve been more relevant and a lot funnier a decade ago when people still used home phones and energy drinks were in their heyday.

Nothing stood out as being exceptionally funnier than the rest or more memorable, for that matter.

It was a good show, put on by a practiced comedian who knows he’s a master of his domain and doesn’t stray from it – not that there’s anything wrong with that.

 

Rating: 3/5

 

 

Review by Kyle Slavin

kslavin@saanichnews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Nanaimo-raised singer Allison Crowe with director Zack Snyder on the set of ‘Man of Steel’ in 2011. Crowe performs a cover of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah in the upcoming director’s cut of ‘Justice League.’ (Photo courtesy Clay Enos)
B.C. musician records song for upcoming ‘Justice League’ film

Allison Crowe’s close connection to director led to rendition of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah

The Gordon Head Recreation Centre stands in as the Quimper Regional Hospital on Feb. 23 for filming Maid, a 10-part Netflix series. (Greg Sutton/District of Saanich)
Netflix transforms Saanich recreation centre into hospital for filming

Facility was closed to public Feb. 23 for filming of Maid

This image released by SYFY shows Meredith Garretson, left, and Alan Tudyk in the new series "Resident Alien." (James Dittinger/SYFY via AP)
B.C.-shot ‘Resident Alien’ invader gets lift-off with viewers

New Syfy series catching on, proving TV doesn’t have to come from premium cable

Nico Rhodes, Lucas Smart, James McRae and Kosma Busheikin (from left) recorded their set for the Nanaimo International Jazz Festival’s online video series at the Harbour City Theatre in December. (Photo courtesy François Savard)
Music starts next week at online Nanaimo International Jazz Festival

Ten free, virtual performances to occur over three weeks in March

The original artwork created by local artist Emily Thiessen, is featured as the Commercial Alley’s eighth installation. (City of Victoria)
 The original artwork created by local artist Emily Thiessen, is featured as the Commercial Alley’s eighth installation. (City of Victoria)
Victoria calls for artists to fill Commercial Alley gallery

Competition open to artists in the Capital Regional District

Cowichan Valley author Teresa Schapansky’s books for young readers have become a phenomenon on Amazon. (Submitted)
Cowichan author tops Amazon charts

Award-winning author Teresa Schapansky learned of a need for low-level readers in the classroom

Nadia Rieger restocks some of the art supplies at the Crows Nest Artist Collective. Their move to stocking more art supplies over the course of the pandemic was a response to increased demand, which she thinks shows people have been turning to creating art to cope with mental health struggles due to lockdowns and restrictions on other activities. Photo by Mike Davies/Campbell River Mirror
Vancouver Islanders using art to conquer COVID blues

It seems people have been turning to their creative sides to stay mentally and emotionally healthy

Chris Bullock, Parksville artist, stands next to his ‘Mermother’ series, on display at the McMillan Arts Centre until Feb. 29. Bullock himself will be at the MAC from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. every Saturday until the end of the month. (Mandy Moraes photo)
Parksville artist Chris Bullock’s unique illustrations on display

‘I’m heavily influenced by old comic book styles from the 1950s’

VIU music instructors Hans Verhoeven, Ben Henriques and Ken Lister (from left) are presenting a weekly jazz performance series with pianist James Darling (not pictured). (Josef Jacobson/News Bulletin)
VIU music instructors presenting online jazz concert series

Musicians getting ‘back in shape’ performing American Songbook standards

Nanaimo’s Todd Cameron won the $1,000 Fan Favourite prize in Vancouver radio station CFOX 99.3 FM’s one-minute movie contest for his version of ‘The Big Lebowski.’ (Photo courtesy Todd Cameron)
Nanaimo man’s 60-second stop-motion ‘Big Lebowski’ remake wins fans’ choice award

Todd Cameron takes home $1,000 prize in Vancouver radio station contest

Kathryn Calder, City of Victoria’s artist in residence, is facilitating a performance and songwriting workshop for youth. (YouTube)
Online music workshops available for Greater Victoria young artists

Artist in Residence Kathryn Calder to host songwriting, performance series

Most Read