Juno Award-nominated Snotty Nose Rez Kids bring their Indigenous hip hop message to the Capital Ballroom in June.

Hip hop duo weave important Indigenous tales

Northern B.C.’s Snotty Nose Rez Kids, here June 7, getting cultural message out to a broad audience

Snotty Nose Rez Kids bring the long awaited Trapline Tour to the Capital Ballroom on June 7.

Known for high energy, electrifying live shows, this hip hop duo from the Hailsa Nation of Kitamaat Village in Northwest B.C. are Darren “Young D” Metz and Quinton “Yung Trybez” Nyce.

Snotty Nose Rez Kids are an important and vital voice, not just within the underground hip hop scene but for the North American musical landscape. Channeling the experiences of Indigenous people – their anger, pride, sadness and joy – they share the stories of Indigeneity to a wider audience without once sacrificing or compromising their own narrative. The name Snotty Nose Rez Kids itself deconstructs a well-worn stereotype; stripping it down and reclaiming it with pride.

SNRK’s two 2017 releases, a self-titled album and Average Savage, led to them being shortlisted for the 2018 Polaris Prize. Now they return with Trapline; an 18-track, trap-heavy offering that is powerful, political and potent.

Hip hop’s role, at its root, is to speak for those who may feel unheard; to give power back to those who feel powerless. SNRK and their self-described Indigenous Trap speak for the land, the water and the traditions; for their ancestors and contemporaries, honouring what has gone before and what is now. Current track “Boujee Natives” is both empowered and empowering, giving shout-outs to First Nations artists, creators and dreamers, those who weave traditional ways into modern living.

While much of their lyricism is rooted in West Coast imagery, it transcends its geographical location to become a rallying cry for resistance across the continent. By choosing to tell their story of Indigenous pride, and the storytelling and spiritual traditions it is rooted in, SNRK educate their non-Indigenous audiences in the experiences faced by First Nations peoples today, further opening up the dialogue of and issues surrounding reconciliation in Canada today.

The duo’s 2019 festival dates span the summer and the country, with B.C. appearances being limited to August’s Starbelly Jam and Cumberland Wild so my advice is to catch them early at The Cap. Tickets are $15, available from Lyle’s Place and TicketWeb.ca. All tickets for the original May 3 date will be honoured.



editor@mondaymag.com

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