Shauna Baird (left to right), Grace Vukovic and Iris MacGregor as the three weird sisters in the Blue Bridge Theatre's production of Shakespeare's classic Macbeth.

Fresh take on classic tale of Macbeth on at Blue Bridge Theatre

The Blue Bridge Theatre's production of Macbeth is on now.

It’s a fresh take on a timeless classic.

That is what audiences can expect from the latest adaptation of Shakespeare’s classic tale of Macbeth on now at the Blue Bridge Repertory Theatre.

Macbeth is the tragic tale of a Scottish general who receives a prophecy from three weird sisters that one day he will become the king of Scotland. He becomes consumed by his ambition and desire and jumps into action to take the throne for himself.

Traditionally, the play involves more than 40 characters. But director Brian Richmond has adapted the tale to be told from the perspective of the three weird sisters rather than its traditional form and involves six speaking and four non-speaking actors.

“The play was originally written with nearly 40 characters so it’s taking a huge show and putting it into a format where six actors can perform it. Primarily, the bulk of the show goes to the three weird sisters,” said Richmond, noting that the Roxy Theatre can accommodate roughly 10 actors on stage at a time.

“It’s going to be a very visually intriguing production. We’ve also put it into a timeless environment . . . and the original score is very contemporary. It’s this interesting meld of old and new that we’re attempting to accomplish,” said Richmond.

Victoria-based actor Celine Stubel, who plays Lady Macbeth, Hecate and murderer three, said working on a smaller production reminds actors of what it takes to put on a show.

“There’s a real feeling that we’re all doing this together and that’s apparent in the staging of it,” said Stubel, who is acting in her first production of Macbeth. “We’re so reliant on each other, helping each other change and handing each other props just at the right time.”

Richmond’s version of the play, which is rooted in the 11th century (the time in which the historical Macbeth was believed to take place), focuses on the traditional political allegory and the role of women in society.

“Another more interesting allegory is that women need to not be seen in a dehumanized context,” said Richmond. “King James I was really a big advocate for witchcraft and that diminishes the role of women in society and Shakespeare was being critical of that.”

The play is on at the Blue Bridge Theatre (2657 Quadra St). Tickets can be purchased by calling Ticket Rocket at 250-590-6291 or ticketrocket.org.

 

 

 

 

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