Campbell River teen produces quarantine musical

Ryver Cegnar performs a song during a dress rehearsal for this living room production of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert in Campbell River, B.C. on June 15, 2020. Photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror
Ryver Cegnar performs a song during a dress rehearsal for this living room production of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert in Campbell River, B.C. on June 15, 2020. Photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror
Ryver Cegnar performs a song during a dress rehearsal for this living room production of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert in Campbell River, B.C. on June 15, 2020. Photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror
Ryver Cegnar performs a song during a dress rehearsal for this living room production of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert in Campbell River, B.C. on June 15, 2020. Photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror

Back in March, when it became apparent that coronavirus wasn’t going anywhere, a Campbell River teen visited the hardware store.

He purchased supplies to build a large living-room-sized bus on wheels. Priscilla, as she would be christened, lived on the top floor of Ryver Santos Cegnar’s house.

With mom’s permission, the living room was slowly transformed into the stage and set for Santos Cegnar’s home production of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.

RELATED: Campbell River musical theatre group brings the magic of Mary Poppins to the stage

The musical has long held a fascination with the 15-year-old artist and actor.

“I am not a drag queen myself, I know the slightest of make-up,” he says. “There’s such big costumes and the set is essentially a big part of it.”

Reef Santos Cegnar perform a song during a dress rehearsal for this living room production of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert in Campbell River, B.C. on June 15, 2020. Photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror

The musical is based on an Australian movie from the 90s: The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. The comedy/drama sees two drag queens and a transgender woman travel across the Australian Outback in a bus called Priscilla. The film follows their adventures and the various characters they meet along the way.

The musical was going to be staged in his previous community in Sudbury, Ont., but before he had a chance to take part, his family moved to Campbell River.

RELATED: WATCH: Timberline brings puppets alive for musical production of Avenue Q

Santos Cegnar, an active member of the community is involved with just about every club at Timberline Secondary, where he’ll be a junior this fall. He’s in the musical theatre program, the leadership program, the sport leadership program, the stagecraft program; he’s in the garden club, the eco club and the knitting club.

“Essentially any club you could imagine,” he says.

He’s played many parts throughout his time in theatre, but most recently, he’s played Goodman King in Timberline’s production of Fame, and Harry in their production of Mamma Mia!. He’s played Robertson Ay in Shoreline Musical Theatre Society’s Mary Poppins. In March, he was Nicky in Timberline’s Avenue Q – School Edition.

Ryver and Reef Santos Cegnar perform a song during a dress rehearsal for this living room production of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert in Campbell River, B.C. on June 15, 2020. Photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror

With public health officials encouraging British Columbians to stay home, Santos Cegnar used the time to work on his informal production of Priscilla. He mixed the music, planned the visual light show, choreographed the show. Then he recruited his family. Nana, Mirian Cegnar helped with costumes; mom, Tanya Cegnar, got training on the light board; and little brother, Reef, got a part in the show.

They rehearsed a few times a week and just two days before the show was set to be live-streamed, they held their first full run-through.

On a rainy night in June, their south Campbell River home is bustling. The shades are drawn in preparation for the dress rehearsal as Mirian does some last-minute stitching on an unfinished costume. Reef stays in his room until the last minute as his older brother sets up the room for the show, moving furniture out of replica Priscilla’s way. Tanya settles in under the lighting truss, control panel in hand and hits play. The first notes of the opening number play through the speakers.

Ryver and Reef Santos Cegnar perform a song during a dress rehearsal for this living room production of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert in Campbell River, B.C. on June 15, 2020. Photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror

Santos Cegnar had never performed in drag before, but he didn’t shy away from the challenge for the show. Embracing the jukebox musical – where the majority of songs are well-known, rather than original numbers (like Saturday Night Fever, based on the Bee Gees and others; Mamma Mia!, based on ABBA, and Jersey Boys, based on the music of Frankie Valli and Four Seasons) – Santos Cegnar included many numbers in his production, but edited down so it wouldn’t last more than one hour. There’s a dizzying amount of costume changes, all made possible with Mirian’s backstage help. One number sees Santos Cegnar change costumes five times in just three minutes.

RELATED: The Campbell River arts sector prepares to weather COVID-19 storm

Two days after the rehearsal, with social circle friends settled onto the front-row couch and dozens of audience members tuning in from their own homes, the red light on the camera blinks on and the show begins.

With a few hundred views, Santos Cegnar’s living room production is receiving praise from its online viewers. While the spinning set of Priscilla is long disassembled, the creator says there may be more productions on the horizon.

Mamma Mia! has long been a favourite of Santos Cegnar and his friends. They may be belting the catchy ABBA tunes before the summer is out.


@marissatiel
marissa.tiel@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

ArtsCampbell River

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

BEHIND BARS: Relaxed and refreshed at The Palms

Sneak peek at Victoria’s freshest new bar

Ocie Elliott: Facing the Music

Victoria duo describes effects of COVID crisis

YOUR AUGUST HOROSCOPE: It’s Leo Season!

Georgia Nicols giving us insight on what lies ahead this summer

The Old Schoolhouse Arts Centre in Qualicum Beach to re-open on Aug. 11

Hours are Tuesday to Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sand sculptor creates special eagle head in Qualicum Beach

Kaube fashions work behind Civic Centre

Parksville artist takes home Sooke Fine Arts People’s Choice Award

Francine Street’s winning piece is titled ‘Ken’

Poetry contest started for Vancouver Island poets

“We’re such a unique group,” says founder on why she wanted to start the collective

Nanaimo Fringe Festival productions adapt to new online format

10th annual festival to be live-streamed due to COVID-19

Island pub wants people to ‘drop five’ to keep music alive

Royston’s Charlie Aiken thinks his plan can help artists and venues alike

First Arts Alive sculptures of 2020 now installed

Oak Bay’s annual public art exhibition starts anew

Most Read