The Christopher Weddell-directed romantic comedy Two Gentlemen of Verona, (cast members pictured) possibly Shakespeare’s first play, is featured during this year’s Greater Victoria Shakespeare Festival, along with Julius Caesar. The festival runs July 4-27 at Camosun College’s Lansdowne campus and Aug. 1-3 at Saxe Point Park in Esquimalt. Courtesy G.V. Shakespeare Festival

2019 Shakespeare Festival offers both ends of the emotional scale

Annual outdoor theatre event returns to Camosun Lansdowne campus and Saxe Point Park

Since 1991, the Greater Victoria Shakespeare Festival has been treating local audiences to outdoor performances of some of the Bard’s best.

The 2019 season, running July 4-27 at Camosun College Lansdowne Campus and Aug. 1-3 at Saxe Point Park in Esquimalt, features two of the great playwright’s most treasured works.

First, festival-favourite director Christopher Weddell will be presenting a “rollicking” rendition of the comedy Two Gentlemen of Verona. Believed to be written sometime around 1590 and possible Shakespeare’s first play, the festival describes this work as a “rom-com that celebrates youth, impulsivity, bad decisions, and unexpected endings – plus a dog.”

Then, turning slightly more serious, festival newcomer director Tamara McCarthy will bring to the stage the quintessential tragedy Julius Caesar. McCarthy, a Jessie Richardson Theatre Award nominee from Nanaimo, is preparing an “exciting interpretation of this classic political thriller with spellbinding schemes and violent betrayal.”

Audiences are free to bring lawn chairs, blankets and/or cushions to get the most out of this outdoor experience, and picnics are also encouraged. A concession will be available featuring hot beverages and some snacks. Well-behaved furry friends are also allowed.

The festival is also partnering with Dine In Victoria, with food from local restaurants available to be delivered right to the festival venues. One restaurant will be featured each day of the festival, with a simplified menu and all orders arriving in time for the performance.

For more information and tickets visit vicshakespeare.com.



editor@mondaymag.com

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Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, is directed by Tamara McCarthy for the local festival. She brings an exciting interpretation of this classic political thriller, with spellbinding schemes and violent betrayal. The show plays Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.

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