Crowning glory

“A hat person isn’t afraid to stand out in a crowd and grab a little attention,” says Roberta Glennon, owner of Roberta’s Hats.

Roberta Glennon poses in her shop Roberta's Hats on Government Street.

Greek fisherman, bowlers and Heisenbergs. They are not invitees to Grandpa’s birthday party, but timeless hat styles hitting Victoria streets.

For those sporting the styles, it’s not about being born a “hat person,” but having a sense of confidence or the desire for a little drama.

“A hat person isn’t afraid to stand out in a crowd and grab a little attention,” says Roberta Glennon, owner of Roberta’s Hats, the only place in the city where thousands of hats in all varieties are waiting to be discovered by bold fashionistas.

With the November drizzle coming and hats moving from the periphery to mainstream fashion, the time is now to experiment with headwear. Popular at the moment are floppy boho styles and the pork pie, also known as the Heisenberg for the Breaking Bad character of the same name. Steampunk is still around, slouchy toques are in demand and men’s caps along with fedora sales have yet to wane, says Glennon, clad in a sleek men’s cap herself. As long as the wearer puts on the matching level of confidence, it doesn’t matter if they leave Roberta’s Hats in a simple knit or ostentatious pirate hat, which, by the way, is not considered a costume piece by some.

“I think it’s more fun now that people wear hats because they want to, not just because it’s the societal norm,” says Glennon, who started her business 21 years ago after first having sewn her own dramatic styles. “Back in the day, ladies got their hats and gloves and all that, but now people have a little more fun with their fashion and I like that better.”

When customers walk into 1318 Government St., declare they look terrible in hats and request a piece that will change their mind, unfortunately, she says, it’s too late. “They’re setting them self up for failure. You’ve got to put yourself out there. Feel good to look good.”

 

Just Posted

God’s Lake tells the stories of missing and murdered indigenous women

By Sheila Martindale God’s Lake is a collection of monologues, taken from… Continue reading

Most Read