Letter – Slow genocide

Over the past hundreds of years, the first peoples in Canada have made agreements for resource use with corporate Crown enterprises.

Slow genocide

Over the past hundreds of years, the first peoples in Canada have made agreements for resource use with corporate colonial Crown enterprises. The Idle-No-More movement has appealed for a fresh examination of the deals between our First and Second peoples. All such agreements in the name of the Crown, and supposedly for the benefit of the second peoples of Canada, are managed by the department of Indian Affairs.

The state of near universal squalor, poverty, desperation and the social ills that are derived from such conditions is evidence to the effectiveness of this department.

From the results we can deduce that the aim is genocide. That the suicide rates seem to rise is further proof of its effectiveness in generating desperation.

This is the precedent in law that our corporate tenants are counting on. We lease or license corporate enterprises to use our public commons and all our public resources.

In recent times, Canada’s corporate tenants are taking all and giving nothing. We, the second nation, are on the path to a slow genocide at the mastery of our corporate tenants.

Dee Shoolingin,

Duncan,  BC

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