If you really don’t care, don’t vote

I’m having an internal struggle right now. I’m wondering whether or not to write one of those “People of the capital, go vote!”

I’m having an internal struggle right now. I’m wondering whether or not to write one of those “People of the capital, go vote!” pleas for the general population to suddenly embrace the concept of civic duty and vote in the municipal election on Nov. 19.

This is a new conflict for me. In 2008, I wrote a letter to Monday conveying the above message, and in the 2010 by-election I wrote of voting: “It takes half an hour, and if you don’t do it everything will stay exactly how it is right now, nothing will change, and we’ll all just go on wondering why life slowly gets weirder and harder in our beautiful, sleepy little Victoria.”

And I wasn’t the only one, oh no. Every politician in the known universe begged you, the voter, to exercise your rights, do your duty, change the world, make a difference in your community, get involved, get excited, get out and vote!

Clearly, none of that worked.

The 2008 voter turnout in Victoria went up by about 0.57 per cent over 2005 — hardly a sudden groundswell of democratic fervor, especially considering that same number had dropped by almost five per cent between 2002 and 2005.

The recent by-election saw another drop of 1.05 per cent, and even then 1,176 of those people forgot to vote for a politician. Despite the best efforts of the good civic-minded folks here in the capital, You (You know who You are) aren’t voting.

So I’ve decided I’m not going to tell you what to do. If you don’t want to vote, then don’t.

If you enjoy paying $1,200/month for your bachelor apartment, don’t vote.

If you’re cool with stepping over people on Douglas Street because they have nowhere else to go, don’t vote.

If you think Occupy Victoria is populated by useless dope fiends just looking for somewhere to shoot up on the government’s dime, don’t vote. If you prefer suburbs over farms, don’t vote. If you don’t like pools or sewers or having a job within 100 kilometers of your house, don’t vote.

If you’re that person, save the walk to a polling station on the 19th. Instead, you can sit at home, read a book and take comfort in the knowledge that absolutely nothing will ever change here in quiet, sleepy little Victoria. M

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Celebrate Victoria Pride Week

The Victoria Pride Society has organized some stop-notch virtual entertainment, including the Virtual Pride Festival on July 5.

Children’s author honours Oak Bay sisters murdered by father

Proceeds from children’s book go towards child abuse prevention in Greater Victoria

Sidney Museum and Archives reopens brick by brick with Lego exhibit

Museum joins other reopenings including Sidney library, Shaw Centre for the Salish Sea

Vancouver Island Symphony, Kerplunks up for Western Canadian Music Awards

Winners to be announced via live stream on Sept. 25

10th annual Nanaimo Fringe Festival to be held online due to COVID-19

Festival will feature six productions by local, regional and international artists

Nanaimo’s Kismet Theatre Academy closes after eight years due to COVID-19

Bonnie Catterson founded the school in 2012 as ‘a place for the oddballs’

Home dance videos to be part of this year’s Infringing Dance Festival

Crimson Coast Dance Society seeking ‘backyard dance’ submissions to compile into video

Ucluelet loses one of town’s oldest art galleries

Mark Penney Gallery shuts down due, in part, to Hwy. 4 closures and COVID-19 pandemic.

Vancouver Island drummers pay belated tribute to Neil Peart of Rush

Canadian Rock and Roll Hall of Fame drummer died of cancer at age 67 in January

Yukon poet kjmunro headlines Port Alberni’s virtual Words on Fire

Monthly spoken word event continues virtually at Char’s Landing

Most Read