B.C.’s carbon tax is a complete fraud

Gag me with a gasoline nozzle — can this be true?

Gag me with a gasoline nozzle — can this be true?

Have a read of this headline: “B.C. carbon tax as popular as ever, according to a new Pembina Institute poll.”

I love a poll that provides a telling snapshot of the public mood, but I did not see a single British Columbian celebrating on July 1 when the government hiked gas prices by 1.11 cents to inflate the carbon tax to 5.56 cents per litre.

Former premier, and would-be trendsetter Gordon Campbell — working off the back of a napkin as usual — ushered in the carbon tax in 2008 at 2.4 cents per litre. It was part of his grand enviro fantasy to cut greenhouse gas emissions by more than 33 per cent by 2020. By this time next year, the tax will be 6.8 cents per litre.

The Pembina Institute — the global warming shrine to self-fulfilling prophesy — tells us we love the carbon tax. Its latest press release states: “Of 830 British Columbians surveyed, 69 per cent expressed some degree of worry over global warming. Asked how the provincial government should raise revenue, taxes on carbon and other pollutants proved to be the second most popular choice behind corporate income taxes.”

In fact, there is a glaring credibility gap between Pembina’s puffery and its actual “poll” findings. Pembina asked what is the best way to raise revenue to fund services “such as health care and education.” More than 70 per cent said corporate income taxes and less than 20 per cent rated carbon taxes as their first choice.

Asked to rate carbon taxes as positive or negative, 68 per cent of respondents were “somewhat negative,” “very negative,” or too numb to venture an opinion.

As popular as ever? Utter nonsense!

Pembina also asked: “Do you think the carbon tax should continue to increase after 2012 as part of B.C.’s efforts to reduce pollution that causes global warming.” More than 50 per cent said “no” and more than 20 per cent could not be bothered to pass judgment.

It would seem that the Pembina Institute — comfort blanket for a generation of global warming insomniacs — is pulling the wool over our eyes.

Why? Because B.C.’s carbon tax is a fraud and should be repealed.

The government says: “The purpose of the tax is to send a price signal to reduce the use of fossil fuels and thereby emissions. Several studies show that consumers generally respond to higher gasoline prices by reducing consumption either by purchasing more fuel efficient vehicles or by driving less.”

More nonsense! Gasoline sales have increased each year since the carbon tax was introduced.

Further, the largest increases in B.C. emissions continue to come from fossil fuel industries and transportation. However, the government continues to promote the coal and oil and gas sectors and spend mega-millions on highway infrastructure while giving modest financial support to critical public transit priorities such as the upgrading of the E&N corridor.

My question is simple: When will the post-Campbell Liberals wake up and realize that we are the only jurisdiction in North America that has adopted this useless tax?

And, when will Premier Christy Clark realize that putting families first does not mean penalizing them for driving their kids to soccer practice in the family van. M

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