Islanders dining out for life

It’s not every day you can justify taking yourself out for breakfast, lunch and dinner, but on April 25, hundreds of Victorians will.

Staff from AIDS Vancouver Island dined to save lives in 2012. This year, the organization hopes to raise $40,000 by convincing all foodies to eat out at the eighth annual event.

Staff from AIDS Vancouver Island dined to save lives in 2012. This year, the organization hopes to raise $40,000 by convincing all foodies to eat out at the eighth annual event.

It’s not every day you can justify taking yourself — and maybe all your friends — out for breakfast, lunch and dinner, but on Thurs., April 25, hundreds of Victorians are planning to do just that.

“I haven’t picked my restaurants yet, but I know I’m going to be eating out for all three meals,” says AIDS Vancouver Island (AVI) communications head Eric Berndt.

Berndt is just one of the countless diners excited to partake in the eighth-annual Dining Out For Life, a one-day affair that will see 80 local restaurants around the Island donating 25 per cent of all food and non-alcoholic drink proceeds to AVI’s program funding. While many diners come for the mission, even those who just happen to eat out this Thursday will help the cause, which is expected to raise more than $40,000 in support of people living with HIV/AIDS on Vancouver Island.

“Many restaurants have told us reservations for April 25 are already coming in, so we are encouraging diners who are hungry for a new restaurant experience, or who want to support their favourite restaurant, to be sure to make reservations,” says AVI’s James Boxshall.

This year’s event doesn’t come without its own political curve. AVI was one of the many businesses to boycott the Nanaimo Daily News by pulling ads after the paper ran a controversial letter to the editor last month regarding First Nations. Since that time, the News has been in negotiations to gain back AVI’s and other businesses’ ads.

“AVI is an organization that exists to root out discrimination and stigma, and as part of our mandate it was important for us to show solidarity,” says Berndt. “What’s amazing, is that 10 years ago we may not have had these conversations, so it really speaks to where we are at that we can pull ads and that people listen, that the community is there to catch us and support us in that decision, too.”

Funding for Thursday’s affair goes directly towards the AVI communities across Vancouver Island, with support, food and prevention program offices in Victoria, Nanaimo, Courtenay, Campbell River and Port Hardy.

“The support we receive from Dining Out For Life means the world to us and helps us to sustain the work we do, feeding people and educating them to stay HIV free. Every donation counts,” says Katrina Jensen, AVI executive director.

As a bonus this year, participating diners will also have an opportunity to win a prize package including a night for two at the Chateau Victoria and a $750 voucher at Expedia Cruiseship centres. Other prizes will be given away on the event’s Facebook page for diners who post photos online.

See the full list of participating restaurants at diningoutforlife.com/vancouverisland, with many offering breakfast, lunch and dinner options. M

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Artist Daniel Cline discusses his sculpture, Harmony Humpbacks, during the June 20 walking tour of Oak Bay’s 2019 ArtsAlive sculptures. Harmony Humpbacks was purchased by Oak Bay as the 2019 people’s choice winner and is permanently installed at the Beach Drive entrance to Willows Park. (Kevin Murdoch Photo)
Influx of donated art a ‘fantastic problem to have,’ says Oak Bay mayor

Oak Bay goes from zero to 10 permanent art pieces since 2015

Nanaimo graphic designer Amy Pye has written and illustrated her first children’s book, <em>G is for Grizzly Bear: A Canadian Alphabet</em>. (Photo courtesy Amy Pye)
Nanaimo graphic designer releases first children’s book

Amy Pye teaches the Canadian alphabet in ‘G is for Grizzly Bear’

The Vancouver Island Symphony’s Back Row Brass Quintet – including trumpeter Mark D’Angelo, tuba player Nick Atkinson and French horn player Karen Hough (from left) – were scheduled to tour the Nanaimo area with Christmas Under the Big Tent, but the concert series has now been cancelled. (Photo courtesy HA Photography)
Symphony brass quintet’s Christmas concert series cancelled

Performances were to happen at venues in Parksville and Lantzville next month

The Sheringham Point Lighthouse, near Shirley. (Contributed - Lee-Ann Ruttan)
New book shines a light on Sheringham Point Lighthouse

Publication examines history, lightkeepers, and volunteer society

Victoria-based guitarist Eric Harper performs at the Port Theatre on Nov. 27. (Photo credit Tatum Duryba)
Classical guitarist to play at the Port Theatre

Eric Harper to play new songs composed during the pandemic

A sample of some of Lou-ann Neel’s jewelry.
Lou-ann Neel wins the Fulmer Award in First Nations Art

Originally from Alert Bay, Neel’s family is steeped in renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artists

I-Hos Gallery manager Ramona Johnson shows some of the paddles available at the retail outlet. Photo by Terry Farrell
I-Hos Gallery celebrates 25 years of promoting First Nation artwork

K’ómoks First Nation-based outlet has art from all over the country

Bard to Broadway Theatre Society may stage shows outdoors next summer. (PQB News photo file)
Qualicum Beach’s Bard to Broadway group may stage shows outdoors

Theatre society plans smaller productions due to ongoing pandemic

Most Read