Redefining the State of Aging

Age-friendly communities, active engagement, seniors’ cannabis use + more explored in special report

Rear Redefining the State of Aging, a special publication from the Victoria News and Monday Magazine.

What does life in Greater Victoria look like for today’s seniors?

“Today’s 55+ individual is a very different senior than were our parents and grandparents,” says Penny Sakamoto, Group Publisher for Greater Victoria. “Healthier lifestyles, medical care, education and nutrition are some contributing factors, and the results of these shifts are transforming the way we and communities adapt to our senior population. I encourage you to explore Redefining the State of Aging and learn more.

Black Press Media is pleased to explore the vital, yet diverse, issues affecting virtually every Greater Victoria family in one way or another in Redefining the State of Aging, published by the Victoria News and Monday Magazine.

Find stories exploring such varied topics as age-friendly communities, cannabis use among seniors and building community connections, in addition to resources for needs ranging from mental health and housing to senior activity groups and tips for aging in place.

Here on Vancouver Island, 24 per cent of the population is 65+, the largest percentage in BC. And that doesn’t show any indication of slowing down. In fact, by 2036, Canada’s seniors aged 80+ are expected to more than double to 3.3 million.

While many local seniors face challenges such as access to affordable housing and isolation, especially as we navigate the unprecedented waters of COVID-19, there’s a lot of good news, too. An amazing 93 per cent of BC seniors live independently, including 72 per cent of those who are 85+, and 78 per cent maintain an active driver’s license.

The publication would not be possible without the support of Community Partners, the United Way of Greater Victoria and The Office of the Seniors Advocate of British Columbia, in addition to Island Health and supporting businesses.

“We offer our sincere thanks to the local businesses and agencies who participated in the project, helping us explore these diverse challenges and successes affecting local seniors,” says Monday Magazine publisher Ruby Della Siega.

A history of building community connections

For the past two years, Black Press Media has launched an initiative examining contemporary community issues such as the Opioid Overdose Prevention, understanding Mental Health: We’re In It Together, and Be Ready, a local guide to emergency preparedness.

Raising these often sensitive and always important topics for public conversation is part of our team’s goal to contribute to the community where we work, live and raise our families.

This team of journalists, videographers and designers present the subjects in a comprehensive multi-media campaign which includes a dedicated resource guide (like the one you are reading right now, either in print or online), an in-depth journalism series and related videos on Black Press digital platforms.

In fact, our Victoria Black Press Media team was awarded the prestigious 2019 Jack Webster Foundation journalism award for the Opioid Overdose Prevention initiative, in the Science and Health category.

To read the team’s latest initiative click here to read Redefining the State of Aging.

Health and wellnessSeniors

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