Courses offered through Camosun College Continuing Education & Contract Training add in-demand skills to your toolbox. Businesses or organizations can also arrange for an instructor to lead group training on a given topic, either on one of Camosun’s three campuses or at their worksite.

Get the training you need, when and where you want it!

Custom approach serves Camosun’s Continuing Education students and clients

If you’re considering career or workplace training – either for yourself or your team – you need programming that yields the results you want in a way that works for you.

Camosun College Continuing Education & Contract Training (CECT) may offer the perfect solution – or solutions!

Take courses based on current student data

A recent Camosun survey of Continuing Education students found some interesting insights – 58 per cent of those enrolling in the college’s continuing education courses were seeking personal development, which included workforce training and career advancement.

For example, employees or tradespeople hoping to move into more of a supervisory role find Camosun’s leadership programs “a way to gain skills that will help them be successful,” explains Michelle Traore, Manager of Business Development and Learning Solutions, CECT. Others are developing their business writing, bookkeeping, marketing or computer skills.

“Our focus is training for the future,” Traore says, noting the results of the study have been instrumental as Camosun ensures its programming meets the needs of its students and clients. “We want to make sure the training we offer is current and relevant.”

Why consider Camosun’s career training courses?

Courses offered through CECT add in-demand skills to your toolbox. You can gain specialized knowledge by building on a skill set you already have, or on skills you wish to develop. You can also take a step towards a new promotion by advancing your soft-skills.

There are courses for every interest that suit your schedule

There are also courses for those keen to explore a passion in the artisan or craft industry, photography or woodworking. The survey showed that about 37 per cent of Continuing Education’s students are looking to take courses for a hobby or personal interest.

Beyond the variety of courses on offer, student survey results and client feedback also informs decisions about when and where to offer programming, Traore notes.”We really emphasize the student experience, offering training at a time that works for our students.”Those who are working days, for example, might find leadership courses more accessible during evenings or weekends, while a business arranging a social media course for its team might prefer to carve out time during the work week for a group session.

And that points to the innovative custom opportunities Camosun offers.

Custom solutions can adapt learning and training for your workplace

Through contract training, businesses or organizations can arrange for an instructor to lead group training on a given topic, either on one of Camosun’s three campuses or at their worksite.

Benefits include:

  • Industry-specific knowledge, customized to your organization
  • Connections to a network of post-secondary institutions, business alliances and partnerships
  • Portal to college’s subject matter expertise, services and supports
  • Convenience of location, pricing and logistics

“Customized contract training can be a really cost-effective way to offer employee education programs,” Traore says.

“And at the end of the day, we want to make sure our students and clients get the training that’s most effective for them.”

To learn more about Camosun College’s Continuing Education programs, pick up a print guide, email continuinged@camosun.ca or visit www.camosun.ca/ce

 

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