Theatre stops showing Amy Schumer movie trailer after Langley father complains

It ran before a family-rated movie where children could see it

The Cineplex chain has stopped showing a coming attraction trailer for the Amy Schumer movie “I feel pretty” before the start of a G or “General” rated movie in one Lower Mainland theatre where children might see it.

The decision came after a Langley father reportedly objected to the trailer being shown when he took his wife and daughter to see “The Miracle Season” a family-rated movie about a high school girl’s volleyball team.

The “I feel pretty” trailer showed the excerpts from the raunchy comedy, which is rated PG-13 for “coarse language; sexually suggestive scene (and) nudity.”

In an e-mail to the Langley Times, Cineplex spokesperson Sarah Van Lange said the father contacted the chain after going to see the “The Miracle Season.”

Van Lange said the man and his wife were uncomfortable with some of the content in the trailers for “I Feel Pretty” and “On Chesil Beach,” a film based on the 2007 novel/novella by British writer Ian McEwan.

“In light of (the father’s) concerns … we removed the I Feel Pretty trailer from before screenings of the one film, The Miracle Season, in British Columbia,” Van Lange said.

Representatives of Amy Schumer did not immediately respond to a request for comment from the Times.

Here is the online trailer:

Van Lange said both trailers had been approved by the Business Practices and Consumer Protection Authority (BPCA) for showing.

Movie ratings are a provincial and territorial responsibility, which means while provincial rating agencies use a similar category names, the exact meaning can vary.

A General rating in British Columbia means the content “may contain occasional violence, swearing and coarse language, and the most innocent of sexually suggestive scenes and nudity,” Van Lange said.

An online summary of the plot of “I feel pretty” says it centres on an “ordinary woman who struggles with feelings of insecurity and inadequacy on a daily basis (who) wakes from a fall believing she is suddenly the most beautiful and capable woman on the planet. With this new-found confidence, she is empowered to live her life fearlessly and flawlessly, but what will happen when she realizes her appearance never changed?”



dan.ferguson@langleytimes.com

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