Theatre Review: In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play)

Theatre Inconnu's got a hit on its hands with a play by Sarah Ruhl.

Emma Conde, Celine Richmond, Julian Cervello and Odile Nelson in Theatre Inconnu's production of In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play).

Emma Conde, Celine Richmond, Julian Cervello and Odile Nelson in Theatre Inconnu's production of In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play).

“I’m lonely!” – Mrs. Givings

Theatre Inconnu kicks off its 2013 season with a winner: In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play) by Sarah Ruhl. Basically, it rocks. By turns funny, touching and sexy, Theatre Inconnu’s production bewitches, providing real catharsis and a transcendent, exquisitely tender ending.

In the Next Room takes place in an 1880s spa town in New York State (not to be confused with the inferior 2011 film “Hysteria” about a similar subject, but set in England.) Mrs. Givings watches as her husband treats a parade of women (and, eventually, men) for what he diagnoses as “hysteria.” Whatever their contemporary diagnoses would be, Dr. Givings prescribes rigorous application of electrical charge; in other words, he stimulates them with a vibrator he has invented. Meanwhile, Mrs. Givings remains unaware of the details of her husband’s practice. She is concerned that she cannot provide adequate milk for their newborn baby, and must hire a wet nurse. As desire is liberated by Mr. Givings’ device, forbidden love arises across boundaries of class, race and propriety.

The performances are uniformly excellent. Playwright Ruhl describes her writing style as interpreting “how people subjectively experience life” because “everyone has a great, horrible opera inside of him.” She also says that her plays have a “medieval sensibility of … transformation.” Each actor in Theatre Inconnu’s production brings tremendous, subjective vitality to their roles. Odile Nelson as Mrs. Givings completes a transformative character arc, beginning in smug, racist propriety and finishing by revealing her profound needs. Nelson’s character leads with her hands, which flit about the stage, trying to keep things in their place, and nudge things to where she feels they should be.

Dr. Givings, played by Julian Cervello, captures the persona of a 19th-century man of science, sure of his practice, even if he is oblivious to the emotional upheaval he unleashes around him. In the end, Cervello provides Dr. Givings some humanity and vulnerability. Frequently, actors have to change out of layers of 19th-century women’s costume — on stage — while still meeting all of the beats of a tightly-scripted play. It is an impressive feat.

Director Naomi Simpson also goes credit for both set and lighting design. It’s a wonder how Simpson choreographs a large ensemble cast, unwieldy furniture and complex costume changes, all on Theatre Inconnu’s shallow stage. The set is divided in two, as the script requires: one side is Dr. Givings’ office; the other is Mrs. Givings’ sitting room (which doubles as her husband’s waiting room). Simpson, as lighting designer, synchs lighting changes with the action as it moves from room to room. At times, both rooms are lit; at other times, one room is dim but the action is still discernible. The result is layers of accented action. In Mrs. Givings’ sitting room, an era-appropriate piano sits, poorly tuned, serving as an apt metaphor for her loneliness and neglect.

If there is any justice, Theatre Inconnu has a hit on their hands. See their production of “In the Next Room” while you can.

 

In the Next Room runs at Theatre Inconnu (1923 Fernwood) Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 8pm, and Saturday and Sunday at 2pm until March 2. Tickets are available at ticketrocket.org or 250-590-6291.

 

By Brent Schaus

arts@mondaymag.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Artist Daniel Cline discusses his sculpture, Harmony Humpbacks, during the June 20 walking tour of Oak Bay’s 2019 ArtsAlive sculptures. Harmony Humpbacks was purchased by Oak Bay as the 2019 people’s choice winner and is permanently installed at the Beach Drive entrance to Willows Park. (Kevin Murdoch Photo)
Influx of donated art a ‘fantastic problem to have,’ says Oak Bay mayor

Oak Bay goes from zero to 10 permanent art pieces since 2015

Tomo Vranjes, a Greater Victoria musician and longtime fan of late rock guitar icon Eddie Van Halen, joins artist Paul Archer behind the latter’s Fort Street gallery. Archer, whose airbrushed paintings of rock greats have made him many connections in recent years, painted a likeness of Van Halen following the guitarist’s death last month from cancer. (Don Descoteau/News Staff)
Victoria artist’s king-sized tribute to Eddie Van Halen draws on personal connection

Paul Archer had an up close and personal day with the legendary guitarist in 1980

The Sheringham Point Lighthouse, near Shirley. (Contributed - Lee-Ann Ruttan)
New book shines a light on Sheringham Point Lighthouse

Publication examines history, lightkeepers, and volunteer society

Victoria-based guitarist Eric Harper performs at the Port Theatre on Nov. 27. (Photo credit Tatum Duryba)
Classical guitarist to play at the Port Theatre

Eric Harper to play new songs composed during the pandemic

A sample of some of Lou-ann Neel’s jewelry.
Lou-ann Neel wins the Fulmer Award in First Nations Art

Originally from Alert Bay, Neel’s family is steeped in renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artists

I-Hos Gallery manager Ramona Johnson shows some of the paddles available at the retail outlet. Photo by Terry Farrell
I-Hos Gallery celebrates 25 years of promoting First Nation artwork

K’ómoks First Nation-based outlet has art from all over the country

Bard to Broadway Theatre Society may stage shows outdoors next summer. (PQB News photo file)
Qualicum Beach’s Bard to Broadway group may stage shows outdoors

Theatre society plans smaller productions due to ongoing pandemic

A new short film festival called MORVENFEST is encouraging B.C. secondary students to step into the world of film during their Christmas break. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)
New film festival gives Victoria students exciting opportunity

MORVENFEST is open to all B.C. secondary students over Christmas break

Port Alberni author Diane Dobson has put together a collection of childhood memories, with proceeds going towards the Ty Watson House. (ELENA RARDON / ALBERNI VALLEY NEWS)
Port Alberni writer looks through the eyes of a child

Book raises funds for the Alberni Valley Hospice Society

Most Read