Singer Tyler Shaw glad to be back home in B.C.

Shaw says he was happy to be back in his home province to perform in Sidney.

Tyler Shaw performs his hit songs to a crowd of excited fans at Sidney’s Mary Winspear Centre.

Touching down a few days before his performance, Tyler Shaw says he was happy to be back in his home province to perform in Sidney.

The B.C.-born musician played to an excited crowd Sunday at the Mary Winspear Centre.

“I don’t get home often but when I’m home, it’s like seeing little guys like my little brother here and little sister and all my family, it’s good.”

Performing at a few other stops on his Canadian radio promo tour, he said places like the Mary Winspear Centre  with intimate crowds allow an artist to connect more with the audience. Shaw said it’s neat because you can see everyone’s facial expressions whether they are crying or laughing. He said its an overall good vibe.

“I grew up playing acoustic guitar, playing just that … doing the smaller shows and that’s where my roots are from … that’s me.”

One of his big hits, House of Cards, which was played at the concert, took two full days to make into a video. A tiring process, but worthwhile, he said, as it topped the charts and is one of Shaw’s most popular songs.

One aspect of the song is that it has a woman as a superhero instead of the commonly used male dominated hero.

Shaw said when it comes to his heroes, he has many and they are always changing.

“Growing up it was from my mother to my grandfather to family and now it’s different artists and just people who are kind of living the dream where I want to get to.”

He said he also sets many goals for himself and his big one is to perform internationally.

“I want to touch people as far as I can from around the world. I really want to see what people think.”

At 22. Shaw has accomplished many of his goals.

He said what inspires him can be found while walking somewhere. He could see a couple and he wants to write a song or a conversation.

“It’s pretty weird,” he said with a laugh. “It’s never what I ever thought — that I would be singing and doing this for a living.”

When it comes to his best moments, he said every show is a good moment.

“Every show, just seeing how my music touches my fans and the people. It’s a really good feeling and that’s the main reason why I do it is for people to relate to what I’m feeling. Even if its not exactly what the song means to me, it could be something totally different but at least they could relate to it.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Duncan’s Big Stick lights up red to signal COVID’s devastation of the arts

“COVID-19 has been truly devastating to the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre”

Pandemic reunites 2000s era Victoria rock band The Origin

Saanich musicians recording for first time since 2008

From Nanoose Bay to the bookshelf, Howard the Gnome now a children’s book

Vancouver Island author explores Howard’s move down-Island

Nanaimo country singer releases new music video

‘Adrenaline’ is the second single from Joel Lee’s upcoming debut EP

Nanaimo’s Harbour City Photography Club goes virtual to adapt to COVID-19

Club’s exhibitions, meetings and presentations are now occurring online

Nanaimo’s Western Edge Theatre returns to the stage in Port Theatre debut

Theatre group presents ‘2 Across,’ described as a ‘middle-aged romantic comedy’

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Authors nominated for Victoria Book Prize awards

Finalists for 2020 announced in two categories

Three Nanaimo-area writers up for CBC non-fiction prize

Sheila Brooke, Vicki McLeod and Rachael Preston make 35-person longlist

Resident Alien returns to Ladysmith for filming in early October

New SyFy series back after spring filming interrupted by COVID-19

Island author launches literary podcast with Canada Council for the Arts grant

Shelley Leedhal will air 10 episodes of “Something Like Love” over 10 weeks

Most Read