Alan Tudyk stars as Alien Harry Vanderspeigel in the new series Resident Alien (Photo by: James Dittinger/SYFY)

Alan Tudyk stars as Alien Harry Vanderspeigel in the new series Resident Alien (Photo by: James Dittinger/SYFY)

Resident Alien brings Vancouver Island to the small screen with January premiere

Quirky series shot in Ladysmith will air every Wednesday on the CTV Sci-Fi Channel

Ladysmith is set to make its small screen debut when Resident Alien premieres on the CTV Sci-Fi Channel, Wednesday Jan. 27.

RELATED: Ladysmith set to star in new Syfy series: Resident Alien

The 10-episode one-hour series follows a crash-landed alien named Harry (Alan Tudyk), who takes on the identity of a small-town Colorado doctor and slowly begins to wrestle with the moral dilemma of his secret mission on Earth.

Filming for the series began in Ladysmith in Jan. 2020 prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Film crews were scheduled to return to Ladysmith in mid-March; however, the pandemic halted those plans. After months of uncertainty, film crews were allowed to return in October.

RELATED: Resident Alien returns to Ladysmith for filming in early October

Writer and executive producer for the show, Chris Sheridan, said that finishing the show was a great relief.

“We never knew for sure when we were going to be able to finish the show. It was possible that we might not have been able to finish it, so I do feel incredible relief that we could get back and finish shooting what we needed to shoot.”

“We needed that trip. We couldn’t have finished the show without going back to Ladysmith,” Sheridan added.

The cast and crew followed stringent COVID-19 safety protocols to make that happen. Any cast and crew members that had to travel from America to work on the show were quarantined for 14 days. Once filming began in Ladysmith, cast and crew were tested for COVID-19 three times a week. A private company was hired to oversee the set and ensure everyone was following COVID-19 safety protocols.

In addition to on-set safety measures, the show runners decided to shorten shooting days from 12 hours down to 10 hours to prevent people from making fatigue related mistakes.

All of the COVID-19 safety measures added significant costs to the production.

RELATED: Film commissioner says COVID-19 cost central Island $6 million in economic activity

“It was all for the sake of being safe for our cast and crew,” Sheridan said. “The last thing anyone in the film industry needed was for things to get bad on film sets, and to start making the virus worse in British Columbia.”

Despite the challenges of filming during a pandemic, Sheridan said that filming in Ladysmith was an amazing experience.

“Ladysmith is an amazing town. We got so lucky being able to shoot there. The people were amazing, the town is amazing. The background actors from the community were all great, and the support from the community has been incredible. We’re excited to hopefully have the opportunity to get more seasons and go back to Ladysmith.”

Film Cowichan, which operates under the umbrella of Economic Development Cowichan, estimated that the direct economic impact of the shoot was approximately $800,000, and said there will be a greater residual economic impact lasting long into the future through opportunities like tourism — once tourists can safely visit the Cowichan region.

“There is significant value in other film and tv productions seeing the look of the town on camera and knowing that filming was a very positive experience for both the production and residents,” said Barry O’Riordan, manager of Economic Development Cowichan.

The first episode of Resident Alien will air at 10 p.m. ET – 7 p.m. PST. New episodes are available to stream on CTV.ca and the CTV app.

For more news from Vancouver Island and beyond delivered daily into your inbox, please click here.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Orca 1
Orcas: Our Shared Future

Royal BC Museum dives into the world of orcas with upcoming feature exhibition

Frank Ludwig in a forklift with his long hair during Trooper’s heyday. (Photo submitted)
Humble Island beginnings blossomed into storied career for Trooper keyboardist

Frank Ludwig got his start as a boy pumping the organ in a tiny downtown Chemainus church

Joan Miller with the Vancouver Island North Regional Film Commission says there’s much room for optimism in the region rebounding from COVID-19 and is excited about what the future holds for the region. Black Press File Photo
North Island film industry optimistic about post-COVID rebound

Interest in filming here is still high, according to film commission, once things open back up

The 10-part Netflix series Maid, which is being exclusively shot in Greater Victoria, has been filming in Langford and Colwood over the past two weeks. On April 7, filming will take place on the east side of the Esquimalt Lagoon. (Black Press Media file)
Netflix series ‘Maid’ filming in Colwood

10-episode Warner Bros. production filmed exclusively in Greater Victoria

Lantzville singer Raymond Salgado will sing ‘O Canada’ before the Vancouver Canucks’ upcoming game against the Toronto Maple Leafs on April 17. (Photo submitted)
Lantzville singer to perform ‘O Canada’ at Vancouver Canucks game

Raymond Salgado scheduled to sing the anthem at Rogers Arena later this month

Nanaimo children’s entertainer Steve Romanik, represented by his character Mountain Dweller, is giving away his songs and stories to help raise money for children’s causes. (Photo courtesy Steve Romanik)
Nanaimo children’s entertainer ‘Mountain Dweller’ helping raise money for kids’ causes

Steve Romanik partnering with Nanaimo Child Development Centre, B.C. Children’s Hospital

“Racing Classics” by John Horton depicts sailboats near Trial Island off the coast of Oak Bay. The painting will be featured in his <em>Maritime Impressions</em> exhibit at the Winchester Gallery until April 14.
Greater Victoria galleries beckon spring with vibrant, whimsical nature scenes

At The Galleries: look at what’s on display this month

‘We Are All Beautiful’ by Elise Cole and ‘The Modern Thrall’ by Enigye (Happy) Amarkah (from left) are two of the pieces featured in VIU’s Anti-Racism Arts Festival. (Images courtesy the artists)
Vancouver Island University holds first Anti-Racism Arts Festival

Three-day online event to feature visual arts, performance, film and poetry

Thomas Kuecks, Bellamy Kuecks and Paula Foot have come together to create an album of stories for children. (Nina Foot photo)
Moments with Miss Paula creates musical stories for kids

Music and the spoken word from Island pair available on streaming

Author Eden Robinson poses for a portrait during an interview in Toronto, Wednesday, May 29, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tijana Martin
Trickster trilogy author Eden Robinson hosts online conversation and reading

Haisla and Heiltsuk will join fans in event hosted by Vancouver Island Regional Library

Nanaimo author Lawrence Winkler’s latest book is ‘The Last Casebook of Doctor Sababa.’ (Bulletin file photo/supplied)
Nanaimo author wraps up trilogy following ‘antihero’ Island doctor

Lawrence Winkler presents ‘The Last Casebook of Doctor Sababa’

‘Frank Ney’ by Patrick Flavin, ‘Millstone River Upper Falls’ by John Collison Baker, ‘Labyrinth of Dreams’ by MA Molcan, ‘On the Other Side’ by Liana Ravensbergen, ‘December Snow’ by Laurel Karjala and ‘Jacks Point’ by Dana Smiley (cropped, clockwise from top-left) are among the works in the Nanaimo Arts Council’s latest exhibition. (Photos courtesy Nanaimo Arts Council)
Nanaimo Arts Council presents its first online gallery show

Submissions now open for upcoming ‘Ekphrastic Celebration’ show

Dorothy Sevcov’s exhibition ‘Having Fun With Acrylics’ is on display at Art 10 Gallery until the end of the month. (Josef Jacobson/The News Bulletin)
Experimental paintings now on exhibit at Nanaimo’s Art 10 Gallery

Dorothy Sevcov’s ‘Having Fun With Acrylics’ on display through April

Most Read