Author, actor and success coach Anthony Hamilton performs his one-man play, Confessions of a Time Traveller, Jan. 14 and 19 at the Cook Street Village Activity Centre. Don Descoteau/Monday Magazine

One-man play explores the brain as a time machine

Actor and success coach Anthony Hamilton brings his show to the Cook Street Activity Centre

A one-man play that is part entertainment, part self-help information is coming to the Cook Street Village Activity Centre this month.

Actor, author and success coach Anthony Hamilton says the 60-minute show, Confessions of a Time Traveller, not only entertains by showing how his early dreams manifested later in life, it can help people better understand how to use their brain as a “time machine” to enhance their lives.

“I got the idea of doing a play to tell the back story, of me having this dream and spending 20 years to figure it out,” he says. “It’s a way of saying the secret to success is to have a dream or a goal, see yourself achieving the goal, form a plan and carry that out. It’s not only interesting and intriguing, it’s useful.”

Now 70, Hamilton has been working as a success coach since the 1980s, espousing the idea of utilizing memories, dreams and goals to achieve one’s life desires. The idea of using the stage to share his ideas came to him early last year, after he took a workshop with local actor/educator T.J. Dawe. Hamilton learned that storytelling is a legitimate form of theatre and set to creating a performance-based show.

He applied for and won a spot in the Nanaimo Fringe Festival and polished his story before performing there.

The Victoria shows, scheduled for Monday Jan. 14 at 6:30 p.m and Saturday, Jan. 19 at 10 a.m., also include a question-and-answer session afterward. The performances lead into a six-week program at the Activity Centre called “How to Achieve Your Life’s Goals,” which Hamilton led there last year.

Recognizing the brain’s power to “change our life, heal our past and create our future” has only recently been discovered by academics, he says. But little research has been done into how to tap into that power and put it into action, Hamilton adds.

“It’s what every creative person does … It’s an idea whose time has come.”

Tickets for the play are $5 for Centre members and $10 for general admission, available in advance at 380 Cook St. or at the door if available.

You can find more about Hamilton’s success training programs at mindtimeandpower.com.

editor@mondaymag.com

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