Harry Manx and the Emily Carr String Quartet (Provided)

Indian and Western music combine at the Mary Winspear

Harry Manx and Emily Carr String Quartet play Sept. 23

The Mary Winspear Centre stages Harry Manx and the Emily Carr String Quartet.

Manx has become one of the most successful international touring musicians to hail from Canada. This deeply original multi-instrumentalist has entertained audiences for the past 30 years , in over 40 countries around the globe. He’s created his own genre, often referred to as the ‘Mystissippi Blues’ which is basically an organic fusion of eastern musical traditions mixed with the depth and soul of the Blues. The result is an expressive, moving and unforgettable new sound. His fans often speak of having been drawn into the ‘Harry Zone’ during his performance. His toolbox includes a fascinating range of conventional acoustic and electric guitars, banjo, harmonica, drums and the Mohan Veena which was created by Harry’s Indian mentor Vishwa Mohan Bhatt.

Harry joined by the Emily Carr String Quartet will provide an evening of cross cultural music that references both Indian and western music. His ‘East meets West’ compositions are brought to light in a whole new way with the inclusion of the string quartet. As Harry put it ‘the strings give my music such an amazing lift, feels like I have wings’. Sitting centre stage playing drums and guitars Harry drives the rhythms onward and forward with deep grooves, soulful patterns and spacious tones. Using an Indian slide guitar, an all-metal National steel, a banjo,cigar box guitar and harmonica to lay down his audible vision, the music carries the audience in a trance-like state. The lyrics draw from the works of the mystic poets with words of inspiration woven into story lines about everyday people.

Harry Manx and the Emily Carr String Quartet on Sunday, Sept. 23 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets available at marywinspear.ca.

— Submitted

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