Julián Chalde’s Charco: Songs from Río de la Plata, shares the story of the South American region’s thriving music scene. youtube.com

Hispanic Film Society presents a week’s showcase of Latin, Spanish flicks

UVic’s Cinecenta screening a wide range of Hispanic films from Sept. 18-23

The ninth Latin American and Spanish Film Week returns to the University of Victoria this month with an eclectic lineup of international films.

Hosted at UVic’s Cinecenta theatre Sept. 18 to 23 by the Hispanic Film Society of Victoria, the line-up includes movies from Argentina, Cuba, Mexico, Panama and Spain.

The week opens Sept. 18 with Julián Chalde’s Charco: Songs from Río de la Plata [Charco: canciones del Río de la Plata], a documentary about the region’s thriving musical scene including the capital cities of Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

Sept. 19 brings The Silence of Others [El silencio de los otros] by Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar, revealing the epic struggle of victims of Spain’s 40-year dictatorship under General Franco, who continue to seek justice to this day.

Mexican filmmaker Natalia Beristáin attends Sept. 20 to present her film The Eternal Feminine [Los adioses], exploring the life and work of Mexican writer Rosario Castellanos. A Q&A session in English follows the film.

Sept. 21 brings Sergio & Sergei by Ernesto Daranas, featuring a Russian cosmonaut circling the Earth and a down-on-his-luck Cuban professor in Havana who establish contact via radio equipment. This political satire, based on true events, is an endearing allegory of human solidarity in the face of crumbling regimes. A discussion follows with Queen’s University Prof. Susan Lord, a specialist on Cuban media and society.

Sept. 22 features Julia Solomonoff’s Nobody’s Watching [Nadie nos mira], about an Argentine actor who moves to New York City for a promised film role and a new start. The film deftly explores the life of the immigrant who does not quite play the part of the struggling Hispanic undocumented migrant.

The week wraps Sept. 23 with Ruben Blades is not my name [Yo no me llamo Rubén Blades] by Abner Benaim (Panamá), about the life and work of iconic Salsa singer, actor and activist Ruben Blades.

Films are open to the public and are subtitled in English. Regular prices apply.

For morte information, visit hispfilmvic.ca.

Just Posted

DANCING ANYONE? Museum puts a swing into your step

Royal BC Museum hosting its next adult-only Night Shift event, a swing dance/mixer

Getting OUT with Intrepid Theatre

OUTstages queer theatre festival features packed week of entertainment for fifth anniversary

Vic High theatre staging musical class struggle tale

Cry Baby a love story and social commentary piece presented with campy style

Readers Theatre returns to Congregation Emanu-El

Audience members encouraged to envision plays’ actions from hearing scripts

The Trojan Women and their ancient story coming to Phoenix Theatre

UVic theatre department to stage Euripedes’ Greek tragedy about the aftermath of war

VIDEO: RBCM’s Wonder Sunday brings fossils into focus

Every Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m. kids learn about science and history through interactive activities

B.C. animators land Oscar nominations

‘Animal Behaviour’ by Vancouver’s David Fine and Alison Snowden among several Canadians on the short list

Hollywood announces 2019 Oscar nominations

Netflix has scored its first best picture nomination, something the streaming giant has dearly sought

Reflections of Ladysmith: The Art of Michael Dean

Work, place and people are inseparable for Vancouver Island painter

‘Gotti’ leads Razzie nominations, Trump up for worst actor

The nominations were announced on Monday, Jan. 21 with some movies earning up to six nominations

Sidney Museum’s Lego Exhibition larger than ever

Hundreds of thousands of pieces on display in creations big and small, now through March 31

2019 Canadian Whisky Awards’ big winners announced

Awards held in conjunction with Victoria Whisky Festival

Netflix rejects request to remove Lac-Megantic images from ‘Bird Box’

At least two shows on Netflix’s Canadian platform briefly use actual footage of the 2013 tragedy

Most Read