Group exhibition shows transformations

Raw Materials Transformed by Vancouver Island Sculptors

Michelangelo once said, “Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.” The artists of the Vancouver Island Sculptor’s Guild have been hard at work at this task and the fruits of their labour will be on display in an upcoming exhibition entitled, Transformations.

The name of the show references the transformation that occurs in a piece of wood, stone or clay when the sculptor goes to work on it, turning it into something new. It also reflects the transformative effect of the process of art-making on the artists themselves. As Vancouver Island Sculptor’s Guild president David Hunwick describes, “we are literally transformed by the things we create.”

The opening night of this prestigious group show will give fans of sculpture in Victoria the chance to see artworks exhibiting a huge range of styles and materials, as well as speak to the artists themselves. After enjoying a sophisticated evening of refreshments and socializing at the Sculpture Studio, anyone interested in learning more about the transformative process of sculpture can return the next two consecutive weekends to observe live demonstrations of wood carving, stone carving, moulding and casting techniques, and clay sculpting methods.

The Transformations exhibition is the most recent show put together by the sculptor’s guild, a non-profit artist’s society that aims to bring sculptors a place to share their ideas and inspire each other, as well as put on exhibitions and other events. The guild hosts regular shows and studio visits.

This exhibition will feature works by local artists Daniel Cline, Ted Piers, Jan Johnston, Audrey Vaneer, Linda Lyndsay and David Hunwick.

Along with live demonstrations, the second weekend of the exhibition on Aug. 6 and 7, also marks the beginning of the guild’s sculpture trail project at the Horticultural Centre (formerly known as Glendale Gardens). Six outdoor sculptures will be on display, and the group intends to add six more in the spring to create a permanent outdoor exhibition.

“In my opinion, sculpture is always enhanced when placed in nature,” says Hunwick. “To be able to place a sculpture against the backdrop of the most beautiful colours; textures; light and shadows, only serves to enhance our attempts to imitate nature itself.”

Whether placed within the beauty of nature or an art gallery setting, the sculptures in this exhibition are sure to have a transformative and inspirational effect on the viewer. M

 

 

Transformations

Vancouver Island Sculptors Guild exhibition

The Sculpture Studio ( 211 Harbour Road)

Opening Night reception, Friday, July 29, 6-8pm.

Demonstrations: Saturday and Sunday from 11am – 4 pm and

Aug. 6 and 7, 11am – 4pm.

 

 

By Kelly Dunning

Just Posted

It takes much more than having talent as a singer or musician to pull off a live performance people will remember, says Sooke resident Jason Parsons. (Pixabay.com)
Vancouver Islander writes the book on live performances

Jason Parsons’ new book unlocks the keys to establishing a presence on stage

VIU’s ‘Portal’ magazine is turning 30 years old. (Image courtesy Chantelle Calitz)
Vancouver Island University’s literary magazine ‘Portal’ celebrates 30 years

Virtual launch featuring contributor readings took place April 30

Nanaimo author Haley Healey recently launched her second book, ‘Flourishing and Free: More Stories of Trailblazing Women of Vancouver Island.’ (Photo courtesy Kristin Wenberg)
Nanaimo author pens second book on ‘trailblazing’ Vancouver Island women

Haley Healey’s ‘Flourishing and Free’ follows her 2020 debut ‘On Their Own Terms’

Saanich author Hannalora Leavitt hopes her new book, This Disability Experience, helps to dispel the ‘otherness’ that often surrounds people with disabilities. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)
Vancouver Island author demystifying disability and dismantling otherness

Hannalora Leavitt, who lives with a visual impairment, wants to change how people look at disability

The organizers of the annual 39 days of July festival hope to return to live shows in Charles Hoey Park this year, like in this photo taken in 2019, but audiences at the show may be limited to 50 people due to health protocols. (File photo)
39 Days of July hoping to stage outdoor events in Duncan this summer

Annual music festival will run from June 25 to Aug. 2 this year

Members of A Cappella Plus rehearse for a ’60s-themed concert in 2019. This year the group is celebrating its 40th anniversary. (Bulletin file photo)
Nanaimo’s A Cappella Plus chorus marks 40 years with short documentary

Film covers group’s history, features performance and behind-the-scenes video

Musqueam and Qualicum First Nations artist, Mathew Andreatta, next to several of his ongoing projects, including carvings and illustrations. (Submitted photo)
Island artist considers art a means to reconnect with his Indigenous identity

Andreatta thought of TOSH as a space of learning and creation

Nicolle Nattrass and Michael Armstrong are presenting an online reading on May 9. (Photos courtesy Joni Marcolin/Heather Armstrong)
Nanaimo playwrights present online Mother’s Day script readings

Nicolle Nattrass and Michael Armstrong to read from in-progress plays

Marianne Turley is one of this year’s City of Nanaimo Culture and Heritage Award winners for Honour in Culture. (Bulletin file photo)
Longtime Vancouver Island Symphony board member gets posthumous culture award

Marianne Turley receives City of Nanaimo Culture and Heritage Award for Honour in Culture

Most Read