Ron Pederson and John Ullyatt star in the Belfry Theatre's production of The Best Brothers.

Belfry Theatre’s unique double bill exceeds expectations

The Best Brothers and How to Disappear Completely pair well for thought-provoking evening

Opening night at the Belfry Theatre is always an event.

Whether you like the play or love it, there are friends to see and new people to meet along with the anticipation of something new.

The Belfry’s double bill of The Best Brothers and How To Disappear Completely is both entertaining and compelling – plus you learn a few things as well.

Daniel MacIvor’s The Best Brothers is a sharply-written, funny, honest story of two mismatched brothers dealing with the death of their mother – and what to do with her dog.

The chemistry between actors Rod Pederson (Kyle) and John Ullyatt (Hamilton) is engaging and even sweet at times. They lob the dialogue deftly back and forth across the stage, then bam! their energy fills the theatre.

The pair take turns portraying their mother as she sets the scene for the lifelong sibling battle in a way that at first seems campy, but eventually comes through as tender.

The sets are clean and clever and director Glynis Leyshon, also a gifted opera director, gleans the best from her cast.

After a short intermission, The Best Brothers is followed by Itai Erdal’s unique performance piece How To Disappear Completely.

Erdal moves about the stage, telling stories about his sister, his friend and his mother, all set to the backdrop of film he shot while his mother slowly died from lung cancer.

A lighting designer, Erdal controls the lights from the stage and explains their use – practical as well as emotional – as he goes.

Erdal’s personality is what drives this one hour performance along. He has a unique ability to share from his core, connect with his audience and leave a piece of his heart behind.

Having spoken to Erdal prior to the performance I was a bit trepidacious about the experience. The performance, though is about family, relationships and, ultimately, what we’ll do for love.

The double bill makes for a bit of a long evening but it’s definitely worth staying up for.

Click here for show and ticket information.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Pandemic reunites 2000s era Victoria rock band The Origin

Saanich musicians recording for first time since 2008

From Nanoose Bay to the bookshelf, Howard the Gnome now a children’s book

Vancouver Island author explores Howard’s move down-Island

Nanaimo country singer releases new music video

‘Adrenaline’ is the second single from Joel Lee’s upcoming debut EP

Vancouver Island dance school pirouettes into full-fledged education institution

Steps Ahead studio will provide assistance with distance learning, as well as artistic classes

Three Nanaimo-area writers up for CBC non-fiction prize

Sheila Brooke, Vicki McLeod and Rachael Preston make 35-person longlist

Resident Alien returns to Ladysmith for filming in early October

New SyFy series back after spring filming interrupted by COVID-19

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Island author launches literary podcast with Canada Council for the Arts grant

Shelley Leedhal will air 10 episodes of “Something Like Love” over 10 weeks

Nanaimo’s Cinefest film festival to be held online this year due to COVID-19

CineCentral Filmmakers Society’s annual festival to feature films made in 48 hours

Indigenous artists showcase extreme sport-themed art at Nanaimo Art Gallery

Touring exhibition ‘Boarder X’ features work inspired by skateboarding, snowboarding and surfing

Indigenous artist restores 20-year-old sculpture in downtown Victoria

Four Winds sculpture located near Tug Eatery encourages climate action

Most Read