Amazing Acrobatics

Cirque Du Soleil's Dralion doesn't disappoint

The handbalancer will astound you with her displays of strength and precision.

The handbalancer will astound you with her displays of strength and precision.

When nature is at an imbalance, there’s tension, intensity and awe inspiring displays of strength and  power. When it’s in balance, beauty, love, passion and harmony overwhelm the senses.

Cirque du Soleil will blow you away with Dralion, their show where the four elements that govern the natural order — earth, fire, water and air — take on human form and work to restore the harmony between humans and nature.

This intensely stimulating and colourful show is a feast for the eyes as well as the ears with stunning costumes and an original score performed by live musicians and two vocalists that will hypnotize you with their world beats.

East meets West in Dralion, with traditional Chinese acrobatics like the balancing of massive bamboo poles and hoop diving, where acrobats leap, flip and spring through tiny wooden hoops.

The Dralion itself; a mythical creature that is a cross between the Dragon (east) and the Lion (west), makes an appearance with a reimagination of traditional lion and dragon dancing, energetic tumbling and incredible balancing acts on top of huge wooden balls. At one point in the act, there are five performers balancing ever so carefully on top of one ball. It was amazing, but not as amazing as what else this circus had in store.

The trampoline artists stole the show with their amazing displays of strength, athleticism and courage. Perched on tiny platforms jutting out of the 26-foot wall that makes up the backdrop for the stage, six athletes-turned-artists will leap, twist and tumble onto two huge trampolines, only to land back where they started, perched on the wall. Watch as they jump higher and higher to the point where they can land on top of the wall.

The rope jumpers will take the familiar game we all played as children and take it to new extremes, building a 10-person pyramid and managing to somehow jump rope in unison.

The arial hoop and the arial pax a deux will amaze with their displays of spirit and bravery, hanging more than 30 feet in the air with no harnesses.

You’ll wonder how the handbalancer manages to hold on to the tiny platform as she jostles her weight around, shifting her legs over her head in impressive displays of strength, flexibility and control.

Even though there are acrobats, clowns and freaks of nature, this is no ordinary circus. The attention to detail with the set, costumes and music, the precision of the performance and the imagination of the creators makes Dralion a show not to be missed. It is a family affair, and no matter what your age, you’ll be blown away by what humans can do.  M

Just Posted

It takes much more than having talent as a singer or musician to pull off a live performance people will remember, says Sooke resident Jason Parsons. (Pixabay.com)
Vancouver Islander writes the book on live performances

Jason Parsons’ new book unlocks the keys to establishing a presence on stage

VIU’s ‘Portal’ magazine is turning 30 years old. (Image courtesy Chantelle Calitz)
Vancouver Island University’s literary magazine ‘Portal’ celebrates 30 years

Virtual launch featuring contributor readings took place April 30

Nanaimo author Haley Healey recently launched her second book, ‘Flourishing and Free: More Stories of Trailblazing Women of Vancouver Island.’ (Photo courtesy Kristin Wenberg)
Nanaimo author pens second book on ‘trailblazing’ Vancouver Island women

Haley Healey’s ‘Flourishing and Free’ follows her 2020 debut ‘On Their Own Terms’

Saanich author Hannalora Leavitt hopes her new book, This Disability Experience, helps to dispel the ‘otherness’ that often surrounds people with disabilities. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)
Vancouver Island author demystifying disability and dismantling otherness

Hannalora Leavitt, who lives with a visual impairment, wants to change how people look at disability

The organizers of the annual 39 days of July festival hope to return to live shows in Charles Hoey Park this year, like in this photo taken in 2019, but audiences at the show may be limited to 50 people due to health protocols. (File photo)
39 Days of July hoping to stage outdoor events in Duncan this summer

Annual music festival will run from June 25 to Aug. 2 this year

Members of A Cappella Plus rehearse for a ’60s-themed concert in 2019. This year the group is celebrating its 40th anniversary. (Bulletin file photo)
Nanaimo’s A Cappella Plus chorus marks 40 years with short documentary

Film covers group’s history, features performance and behind-the-scenes video

Musqueam and Qualicum First Nations artist, Mathew Andreatta, next to several of his ongoing projects, including carvings and illustrations. (Submitted photo)
Island artist considers art a means to reconnect with his Indigenous identity

Andreatta thought of TOSH as a space of learning and creation

Nicolle Nattrass and Michael Armstrong are presenting an online reading on May 9. (Photos courtesy Joni Marcolin/Heather Armstrong)
Nanaimo playwrights present online Mother’s Day script readings

Nicolle Nattrass and Michael Armstrong to read from in-progress plays

Marianne Turley is one of this year’s City of Nanaimo Culture and Heritage Award winners for Honour in Culture. (Bulletin file photo)
Longtime Vancouver Island Symphony board member gets posthumous culture award

Marianne Turley receives City of Nanaimo Culture and Heritage Award for Honour in Culture

Most Read