A robotic actor somehow is given the ability to laugh, which leads to hilarious results, in Phoenix Theatre’s newest production, Comic Potential, running Feb. 13-22.

‘Actoids’ hit the stage at UVic’s Phoenix Theatre in February

Robots full of Comic Potential in latest play from UVic’s play

A sci-fi take on Pygmalion brings androids and what it means to be human to UVic’s Phoenix Theatre in February.

University of Victoria theatre students showcase award-winning British playwright Alan Ayckbourn’s 1998 satire Comic Potential from Feb. 13-22.

The story takes place in the near future, when human actors have been replaced by lifelike robots, known as “actoids.” When idealistic young writer Adam discovers that soap opera actoid Jacie (known as JCF 31333) has the ability – or design flaw – to laugh, chaos ensues.

Adam hits numerous walls as he plans to create a T.V. show with the increasingly human android, among them the threat of Jacee having her memory wiped. Not to mention, the two characters start to fall for each other.

Comic Potential stemmed from Ayckbourn’s musings on humans’ ability to laugh and fall in love, and whether those traits should be reserved only for humans. This humorous satire features a cast of wildly different characters, which fans of Born Yesterday and My Fair Lady may enjoy.

After its debut, the play moved to London’s West End in 1999. Later that year, Comic Potential was nominated for a Laurence Olivier award for Best Comedy. Phoenix Theatre’s production is directed by Conrad Alexandrowicz.

Tickets start at $15. For more information, check out the Phoenix Theatre online or go to events.uvic.ca.



editor@mondaymag.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Live theatreUVic

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Victoria Flamenco Festival goes virtual for 2020 event

The show will go online from July 23 to 26

Infringing festival finds a way to dance during pandemic

Nanaimo’s Crimson Coast Dance Society holding drive-in, micro and physically distanced events

Coastal scenes at the forefront for July shows at Victoria galleries

From sculpture to landscape paintings, summer art is about nature

Most Read