Going Organic — the Easy Way

Spud brings harvest box to your door

Going Organic — the Easy Way

Spud brings harvest box to your door

If you’re part of Victoria’s hip environmentalist scene, then you’ll know that organic is where it’s at. But, if you’re like me, you’ll also know that tracking down the best organically grown veg can be a bit of a chore. Unless you’ve heard of Spud.

You might have even seen their shiny delivery vans around town and thought they were just another grocery delivery service. That’s where you’d be wrong. Spud (also known as Small Potatoes Urban Delivery) is dedicated to bringing the best local and organic food to their customers’ doorsteps for about the same price as you’d pay at the grocery store.

Getting your delivery is as easy as signing up on their website. I fell for their green charms last spring, after realizing that I never bothered to buy vegetables. They just weren’t on my shopping radar. And when I did buy them, it was the usual broccoli, carrots, potatoes shtick. So, on the advice of some friends and in an attempt to get out of the drudgery of grocery shopping, I looked up Spud.

Their site, spud.ca, was cleanly designed and accessible. Before long I’d found the holy grail of my vegetable quest, something Spud calls a “fresh harvest box.” No longer would I have the turmoil of trying to select vegetables myself! By starting with “my fresh harvest box preferences” I could select how often I wanted to receive it, how much I wanted to spend and whether I preferred local produce over variety, or vice versa, or both (a popular feature among the aforementioned hip environmentalists, no doubt).

Then it was off to an exhaustive list of fruits and vegetables to rate them from 1 (never send me this) to 5 (always send me this). Now Spud selects my vegetables for me every week, based on my preferences and what they have in stock. All I need do is pay the bill and wait for my blue Rubbermaid container of delectables to appear on my doorstep on the appointed delivery day.

The best part is that I eat practically obscene quantities of vegetables now. Partly because they’re delicious and partly because my fridge is overflowing with them.

There is a downside to the harvest box, though. Since I don’t regularly check the site to see what I’ll be receiving, there are weeks where I receive more kale and onions then any individual could possibly eat. Around Christmas, I had so many bags of yams that I gave a few away as gifts.

But, that complaint aside, Spud is now my main source of groceries, kale and all. Check Spud out for yourself at spud.ca the next time your fridge is empty. M

 

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