Fitness, foods and facials for a non-surgical facelift

The elusive fountain of youth has been a romantic dream for centuries. While Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León ended up discovering Florida, most people still associate him with his failed quest for the fountain.

The elusive fountain of youth has been a romantic dream for centuries. While Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León ended up discovering Florida, most people still associate him with his failed quest for the fountain. Even today, people continue to search for the art of growing young and many products and procedures have proven helpful.

Botox, dermabrasion and the classical facelift are options for a youthful appearance, but many aren’t aware that workouts, foods and acupuncture can also have a positive effect.

Facercise

Exercise your face to activate the facial or mimetic muscles to hold a youthful expression. As we age our facial muscles weaken. This aging process can be tweaked with simple at-home workouts. Facercise, or facial yoga, prevents the muscles from drooping by toning, tightening and stretching specific areas. Prior to Botox, facial exercises were very popular and are coming back as self treatment.

Many facercises can be found online, but be sure you’re following a trained coach or yoga instructor. You will find easy moves like puffing your cheeks, to more complex moves where you hold the muscle ends with your finger while pulling a face. Search up a few and make faces in your mirror. It’ll keep you looking young.

Food for Your Face

Super foods and healthy diets are not only good for your body, but also great for your skin.  While foods with a high glycemic index, like bread, can cause inflammation and a loss of elasticity, it is believed that high-protein diets are good for your face because of anti-inflammatory qualities. Collagen is a protein in our body that creates suppleness in the skin’s dermal layer.

Over time, collagen production naturally decreases. Certain foods can help restore this protein: soy encourages the body to create more collagen, blueberries carry vitamin C for manufacturing collagen and oily fish such as herring protect collagen with omega-3s.

Healthy qualities in the food can also work from the outside. Yes, this is putting food on your face.

Try mixing a few ingredients, ground up, and massage onto your skin. Let the mask rest for about 10 minutes and gently rinse off. There are a range of great face foods: sugar is an exfoliate, honey holds moisture, olive oil and carrots have antioxidants, avocado gives vitamin E, strawberries have folic acid, which is good for fighting acne, and finally eggs are believed to add protein. Egg on your face — no longer a disgrace.

Acupuncture Facelifts

Acupuncture has been used in the past to relieve pain, help mood disorders, control PMS, tame addiction, control obesity and help with infertility. It also can create a face tightening lift.

Tiny needles are inserted into the skin, focusing on fine or age lines. The intrusion causes a micro-irritation under the skin that reduces the look of wrinkles. Progress does take several sessions, but clients claim there is a noticeable difference in the youthfulness of their skin. When done properly, this procedure is considered a low-pain treatment, and even relaxing. Cosmetic acupuncture should be done by a trained professional. Clinics can be found here in Victoria.

Non-surgical facelifts don’t have the same results as surgical ones, but results can be dramatic.  Explore your options, like Ponce de León did, and find your own fountain of youth. Workout your wrinkles, eat right and wear the leftovers, or try acupuncture.

Give your face a boost with a non-surgical facelift, but don’t forget the sunscreen to protect your efforts. You will look younger and feel better, too.  M

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

VIU’s ‘Portal’ magazine is turning 30 years old. (Image courtesy Chantelle Calitz)
Vancouver Island University’s literary magazine ‘Portal’ celebrates 30 years

Virtual launch featuring contributor readings took place April 30

Nanaimo author Haley Healey recently launched her second book, ‘Flourishing and Free: More Stories of Trailblazing Women of Vancouver Island.’ (Photo courtesy Kristin Wenberg)
Nanaimo author pens second book on ‘trailblazing’ Vancouver Island women

Haley Healey’s ‘Flourishing and Free’ follows her 2020 debut ‘On Their Own Terms’

Saanich author Hannalora Leavitt hopes her new book, This Disability Experience, helps to dispel the ‘otherness’ that often surrounds people with disabilities. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)
Vancouver Island author demystifying disability and dismantling otherness

Hannalora Leavitt, who lives with a visual impairment, wants to change how people look at disability

Michael Demers, performing here as a member of The Lonely, died May 1 after a year-long battle with leukemia. (Photo by Benji Duke)
Victoria music community mourning Michael Demers

Veteran singer-songwriter, co-founder of The Lonely dies at 63 due to leukemia

The Royal B.C. Museum has added a tamba dining set, used by a Punjabi man on his voyage to Canada in 1927, to its ‘100 Objects of Interest’ online collection. (Courtesy of Royal B.C. Museum)
Punjabi dining set added to Royal B.C. Museum’s ‘100 Objects of Interest’ collection

Set used by Indar Singh Gill on his voyage from Punjab to Canada in 1927

Musqueam and Qualicum First Nations artist, Mathew Andreatta, next to several of his ongoing projects, including carvings and illustrations. (Submitted photo)
Island artist considers art a means to reconnect with his Indigenous identity

Andreatta thought of TOSH as a space of learning and creation

Nicolle Nattrass and Michael Armstrong are presenting an online reading on May 9. (Photos courtesy Joni Marcolin/Heather Armstrong)
Nanaimo playwrights present online Mother’s Day script readings

Nicolle Nattrass and Michael Armstrong to read from in-progress plays

Marianne Turley is one of this year’s City of Nanaimo Culture and Heritage Award winners for Honour in Culture. (Bulletin file photo)
Longtime Vancouver Island Symphony board member gets posthumous culture award

Marianne Turley receives City of Nanaimo Culture and Heritage Award for Honour in Culture

The CVAC Fine Arts Show is always something to see and 2021 promises to be no different, as they adopt a fully multimedia approach. (File photo)
Cowichan Valley Fine Arts Show goes multimedia for 2021

The show, which runs from May 1-22 will be available both in person and online.

Dinner After a Death, a painting by Sooke artist Bryan Cathcart is part of a collection featuring his work at the Outsiders and Others Gallery in Vancouver. (Contributed - Bryan Cathcart)
Sooke artist finds creativity by expanding artistic horizons

Bryan Cathcart, 26, featured at Vancouver gallery

Viking-inspired fantasy writer Joshua Gillingham of Nanaimo and Seattle-based Islamic science fiction editor Muhammad Aurangzeb Ahmad are co-editing ‘Althingi – The Crescent and the Northern Star.’ (Photos submitted, illustration by Lada Shustova/Figue)
Nanaimo author co-editing historical anthology connecting Vikings and Muslims

Joshua Gilligham presents ‘Althingi – The Crescent and the Northern Star’

Saltair-based writer, Krista May. (Janet Kelly photo)
Island writers make long-list for 2021 CBC Short Story Prize

Krista May and Angie Ellis among 33 finalists selected out of over 3,000 entrants

Most Read