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Victoria Byelection

Donald Galloway (Green Party) -
Donald Galloway (Green Party)
— image credit:

Six candidates compete to become the new MP for Victoria on Nov. 26

Who will it be, Victoria?

 

Donald Galloway (Green Party)

What are the pillars of your campaign this election?

I have three main pillars: to reclaim democracy, to respect science and evidence-based decision making and to reclaim our future. We have to get back into parliament and make the change happen there. There is a failure to stand up against [Stephen] Harper; he has been allowed a false majority and the truth has been in short supply in government. We will call on the government to stop basing decisions in ideology rather than social science — and we will fight tooth-and-nail against oil pipelines.

What issues will you push at the federal level?

Instead of pushing issues, we will really be pushing back. There are issues weakening Canada’s sovereignty, but as long as Harper is in power he will have to be held accountable. And we still have so many issues that need to be addressed, like homelessness and housing, social services for those in long-term care, and the vindictive measures taken against refugees and those who are incarcerated.

How will you follow the footsteps of Denise Savoie?

I will keep pushing progressive measures that matter to Victorians — the basic needs of individuals living in the 21st century. And by being a listener and being able and willing to stand for social justice.

What is your background in this city, and why does Victoria want you as its new MP?

I arrived in Victoria in 1989. I was teaching in Queens at the time, but met my future wife in Victoria and for the next while spent time figuring out how to come back permanently. Now I am proud to call myself a Victoria native, and have a beautiful 13-year-old daughter who goes to school here, and we take her education very seriously. I’ve worked as a pro-bono legal advisor and as a social advocate for groups with needs. We are the only party not tied to the party system; and we are dedicated to working together.

How will the position affect your current life?

Being elected will turn my current life completely upside down! I have loved the academic work I’ve done and my legal work with refugees has taken all my time, which I will miss once I am elected. I understand that it can be a manic life, where adrenalin is pushing me forward, but it will be different and I am ready for it. M

 

Dale Gann (Conservative) 

What are the pillars of your campaign this election?

Each year, 5,000 students graduate from colleges and universities on the Island. Most cannot find jobs here. We need to create a vibrant economic climate in Victoria to attract and retain our best talent. Our future prosperity depends on building high-technology, knowledge-based businesses. I believe the best way to protect our pensions, our health care system and the social services that make this country so wonderful is to build a solid economic base — to balance the budget, create jobs and opportunities for our young people. I am particularly interested in working to create a healthy business climate for small businesses.

What issues will you push at the federal level?

I will be a voice at the table for Victoria. My key message is that Victoria needs federal support to replace our aging infrastructure — particularly our transportation system. We also need policies that encourage economic development in the region. For too long, Victoria has missed opportunities because we have not had an effective voice in Ottawa.

How will you follow the footsteps of Denise Savoie?

My priority is to build, not to resist change and to fight against economic development. Our government’s focus — and my focus — is the economy. This means creating jobs through training, expanded trade and low taxes. This means support for small business, a key driver of our economy. This means eliminating the deficit and controlling spending and waste in government.

What is your background in this city, and why does Victoria want you as its new MP?

I am a fourth-generation Victorian. I have decided to raise my family here and to work and contribute to the community here. I love this city and I am committed to building a dynamic, vibrant future for Victoria.

How will the position affect your current life?

It will be hard on my family, but I am excited about continuing my work for our community in Ottawa. Over the past 10 years, as the president of Vancouver Island Technology Park, I have participated in the key committees, forums and boards dealing with issues important to Victorians. I will be even more engaged in these activities as your MP. I will carry the voice of Victorians to Ottawa regarding homelessness, sewage treatment, building better infrastructure and building a vibrant community in Victoria. M

 

Art Lowe (Libertarian Party) 

What are the pillars of your campaign this election?

Some of the pillars of my campaign this election are as follows: the pipeline in B.C. to ship crude oil — before anything, all affected communities would have to support the pipeline; fighting the Bill C-30 spying bill, which allows police phone and internet info; marijuana reform and decriminalization; fighting the secondary sewage treatment plant in Victoria; and abolishing personal income tax — the most degrading and totalitarian of all possible taxes.

What issues will you push at the federal level?

I will push all of the above, and any other issues where we might enhance the liberty of all Canadians.

How will you follow the footsteps of Denise Savoie?

I am a Libertarian, not a NDPer, and our values are not the same. We stand for respect of individual rights, an appropriate role of government, and the preservation of freedom and respect for others.

What is your background in this city, and why does Victoria want you as its new MP?

I am 52 years old; I was born and raised in Victoria and grew up in James Bay, and as a Libertarian I have a unique perspective that will enhance the liberty of all Canadians.

How will the position affect your current life?

As for how this will affect my current life, it will be a big challenge, but something that I will adjust to for the better. M

 

Dr. Philip Ney (Christian Heritage Party) 

What are the pillars of your campaign this election?

We are different. The Christian Heritage Party is the only true opposition to the other candidates, because we dare to be different. Heritage has come to Canada through a long line of godly men and we believe in trying to maintain the vast heritage of what people know as Canada — but that heritage is rapidly declining. Canada needs children; lots and lots of children. We welcome every child to Canada. And we stand against people who want to push through revolutionary ideas without knowing how they really affect people — if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

What issues will you push at the federal level?

Declining population, which means the declining number of taxpayers and a declining economy. We need to tighten up medicinal controls and only be performing surgeries that have a proven medical benefit. There is no proven medical benefit for the woman in an abortion.

How will you follow the footsteps of Denise Savoie?

Do I have to?

What is your background in this city, and why does Victoria want you as its new MP?

I have served this community very well. I was on the Greater Victoria School Board for two terms, I was a founding council member of Camosun College, I’ve taught at five universities including McGill, UBC, and in Calgary, Hong Kong and New Zealand. I’ve written for a number of scientific journals and I am a physician who has been an advocate for autistic and disadvantaged children and youth. I’ve looked after this town, and my forbearers built this town. I’m old enough to gain patience and wisdom.

How will the position affect your current life?

I love this place, and I will spend as much of my time here as I can, but I know there are duties we all must step up to do, and I am ready to do them. M

 

Murray Rankin (NDP)

What are the pillars of your campaign this election?

This byelection is about electing an MP that will get things done for Victoria and that will stand up to Stephen Harper and the Conservatives. My campaign has centred around providing Victorians with a clear choice on election day — I will stand up for our community and I will be a principled representative that Victorians can trust.

What issues will you push at the federal level?

For the past year I have been advising the BC NDP on their strategy to stop the Enbridge Pipeline. I will put my 35 years of environmental law experience to use, and I will continue this fight at the federal level. The risks are simply too high. I will take this fight to Ottawa and help defeat this pipeline once and for all. I am also passionate about solving the region’s homelessness problem. This is an issue that goes beyond just the municipal level — we need partnerships between all levels of government. I will fight for a national housing strategy and will approach this problem with the care and commitment that it deserves.

How will you follow the footsteps of Denise Savoie?

Denise has been an amazing representative for our community. She served our community, and represented all who live here — not just those who voted for her. I will do the same. I will put cooperation above politics, and our community above special interests.

What is your background in this city, and why does Victoria want you as its new MP?

I moved to Victoria over 35 years ago to teach at UVic and immediately fell in love with our amazing city. Environmental causes are my passion, and it was through one of the founding executive meetings of the Wilderness Committee that I met my wonderful wife Linda. After years of teaching, I began practicing law and took my beliefs in social justice and equality to the front line. I helped secure gay marriage in B.C., fought for First Nations rights and helped save environmental landmarks like the Sooke Potholes.

How will the position affect your current life?

Just campaigning for this position has already tripled my coffee-drinking — and the real work has yet to even begin! But seriously, being a Member of Parliament is an enormous responsibility, and one that I don’t take lightly. I will dedicate myself tirelessly to the job of serving our community. M

 

Paul Summerville (Liberal)

What are the pillars of your campaign this election?

Some of the pillars of my campaign this election are focused on supporting science and democratic decisions, and stopping a sewage treatment plant from entering Victoria — we are missing the chance to develop green technologies here.

What issues will you push at the federal level?

I will work to reclassify Victoria from a high to low-risk sewage city, I will stand for the legalization, taxation and regulation of cannabis, I will work to develop a national child-care strategy, I will stand against mandatory sentencing and work to build our health care.

How will you follow the footsteps of Denise Savoie?

With great care. I disagreed with Denise about certain issues, like funding sewage treatment, but she made a great effort every day for the people in her riding, and we will continue that. In the event we win, I would like to create a virtual office so that Victorians can reach me even in Ottawa.

What is your background in this city, and why does Victoria want you as its new MP?

Why does Victoria want me as its new MP? I’ll leave that for Victoria to answer. I moved to Victoria in 2004, have acted as adjunct professor at UVic’s Peter B. Gustavson School of Business, I was the president of the Sir Winston Churchill Society of Vancouver Island and I love many things about Victoria — any day of the year there is something interesting to do, and that says a lot about a city.

How will the position affect your current life?

The position will change my life in a simple way. I’ve lived a very interesting life, I’ve lived in many parts of the world, and my goal now is to find out whether my life will become consequential to B.C. and all of Canada. If I am lucky enough to get the vote of confidence, I will continually remember the consequences of decisions you make as a public official. My single most important driving force is knowing that, in this country, children of limited means can have unlimited opportunity. M

 

Are you ready to vote?

Grab your voter information card and head to your local polling station on Mon., Nov. 26. No card? Find your polling station, ID requirements and more on the Elections Canada website: http://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=vot&dir=faq&document=faq2012by&lang=e.

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